skimmia


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skimmia

(ˈskɪmɪə)
n
(Plants) any rutaceous shrub of the S and SE Asian genus Skimmia, grown for their ornamental red berries and evergreen foliage
[C18: New Latin from Japanese (mijama-)shikimi, a native name of the plant]
References in periodicals archive ?
Varieties available are Skimmia japonica Rubella (illustrated), Euonymus Fortunei Emerald Gaiety, Euonymus Blonde Beauty, Choisya ternata Sundance, Ceanothus (Californian Lilac) and Leucothoe Scarletta.
Originally from such far away countries as the Himalayas, China and Japan (which gives rise to their botanical name of Skimmia japonica), their aromatic, glossy leaves provide a perfect foil firstly for the red flower buds and then the dainty panicles of small, white flowers.
Varieties available are Skimmia japonica Rubella (below), Euonymus Fortunei Emerald Gaiety, Euonymus Blonde Beauty, Choisya ternata Sundance, Ceonothus (Californian Lilac) and Leucothoe Scarletta.
Good candidates include Skimmia 'Rubella', violas and winter-flowering pansies, which should flower until the worst weather hits but will re-emerge to bloom again in spring.
Skimmia japonica 'Nymans' carries abundant red berries that last deep into winter.
Try skimmia japonica, a dwarf conifer - cupressus goldcrest seeds off in.
There are even shiny red berries on the skimmia and there are masses of pretty twiggy hazel branches.
If space is tight or you are only able to do container gardening but you'd like some ornamental winter berries, I'd recommend skimmia and gaultheria, both compact enough for pots, which put on a good show.
Another great plant for autumn and winter pots is the skimmia japonica subspecies Reevesiana, which produces long-lasting clusters of bright red berries in winter, nestled among dark evergreen leaves.
Compact evergreen skimmia come into their own in winter with a show of red buds.
Then there is the winter glory of evergreens as a backdrop, such as pines, ilex hollies proudly boasting bright berries, scented rosemary, skimmia with glossy leaves, and yew, reputed to keep bad spirits away.