skin cancers


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Related to skin cancers: squamous cell carcinoma, Basal Cell Cancer

skin cancers

There are three common forms of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma is a proliferation of skin cells in the epidermal or dermal layer. It forms round, shiny lumps on the skin. Squamous cell carcinoma first affects the keratin-producing cells of the skin. It appears as small, scaly, red, raised patches. Malignant melanomas are raised or flat colored patches on the skin made of cancerous melanocytes (pigment-producing cells). The most common cause of skin cancers is ultraviolet radiation (from excessive exposure to sun, for example). Infection, frequent irritation, certain chemicals, and physical trauma, however, can also sometimes lead to skin cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to advocating for increased screening and early detection of skin cancers, Patients Rising is working to spark the conversation about continued innovation and new treatments for melanoma and other skin cancers, as well as ensure that patients have access to vital therapies.
Helen Kennedy, a Macmillan information and support specialist on the unit, said: "The fact ten potential skin cancers were diagnosed is testament to how important events like these are.
It can spread rapidly to other parts of the body and causes more deaths than other skin cancers.
Santiago Centurion, recommend cryosurgery as an efficient treatment for early-stage skin cancers.
Fair skinned and blue-eyed people are especially susceptible to ocular skin cancers, they said.
Go to the websites to learn more and view photos of common skin cancers for recognition.
Skin cancers, including melanoma, basal cell cancer, and squamous cell cancer, are the most common of all cancers.
Most skin cancers are caused by damage from UV (ultraviolet) rays in sunlight.
But those with dark skin aren't completely immune from the damaging effects of the sun - they have a reduced risk of skin cancers, including a 10-20 fold reduced risk of malignant melanoma.
Three of our four children have had skin cancers on their nose.
A study in the 21 December 2005 Journal of the National Cancer Institute now shows a genetic difference between melanoma patients and those with other skin cancers: melanoma patients' chromosomal DNA (chromarin) suffers less damage than other skin cancer patients' when cells are irradiated with ultraviolet B (UVB) light, the part of UV that causes sunburn.