skint


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skint

(skɪnt)
adj
(Banking & Finance) (usually postpositive) slang Brit without money
[variant of skinned, past participle of skin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

skint

(skɪnt)

adj.
Brit. Slang. having no money; penniless.
[1930–35; probably orig. representing dial. pronoun of skinned; see skin (v.), -ed2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.skint - lacking fundsskint - lacking funds; "`skint' is a British slang term"
poor - having little money or few possessions; "deplored the gap between rich and poor countries"; "the proverbial poor artist living in a garret"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

skint

[skɪnt] ADJ to be skintestar sin cuartos, estar pelado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

skint

[ˈskɪnt] adj (British) (= broke) → raide skin test ncuti-réaction f, cuti fskin-tight skintight [ˌskɪnˈtaɪt] adj [trousers, dress] → collant(e), ajusté(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

skint

adj (Brit inf) to be skintpleite or blank sein (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

skint

[skɪnt] adj (Brit) (fam) to be skintessere in bolletta, essere al verde
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
was for a been saving Now I'm skint' Asad "He got a PlayStation for Christmas and I signed in and gave him some games to play.
THE new Channel 4 series Skint Britain: Friends Without Benefits paints a grim picture of Hartlepool life on the dole under the new welfare reform Universal Credit (The Gazette 15.02.19).
When Footballers Were Skint: A Journey In Search Of the Soul Of Football by Jon Henderson (Sportsbookofthemonth.com price: PS12.56, saving PS5.43 on rrp) When Footballers Were Skint opens with an engaging post-war (1947) anecdote involving former Sunderland player Stan Anderson, who recalls the time he was summoned to the office of George Crow, the club secretary, to agree his first professional deal.
Safely into the last 16 after beating Paul Lim, 63, 4-1 in the second round, Anderson said: "I was born skint and I could probably die skint - I don't care.
Until the Right's poster boy for living in the past, Nigel Farage, declared that fighting for Brexit had left him "skint".
Nigel Farage, the former leader of Ukip, has bemoaned being "53, separated and skint" in an interview, adding "there's no money in politics".
"When you come home from holiday, you're a bit skint," said Kerry.
But researchers still warned negative images of the town - like in last year's Skint programme from Channel 4 - could be having negative effects on young residents.
But researchers still warned that negative images of the town - like last year's Skint programme from Channel 4 - could be having negative effects on young residents.
DANNY Dyer revealed he was "absolutely skint" and in a "desperate" situation when he was offered his role in EastEnders.
If you are skint do you borrow money for a new car or house extension?