skite


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Related to skite: Skype, smite, SciTE

skite

(skəɪt)
vb
1. (intr) to slide or slip, as on ice
2. (tr) to strike with a sharp or glancing blow
n
3. an instance of sliding or slipping
4. a sharp or glancing blow
5. (Brewing) on the skite on a skite Scot and Irish on a drinking spree
[C18: of uncertain origin]

skite

(skaɪt)
vb (intr)
to boast
n
1. boastful talk
2. a person who boasts
[C19: from Scottish and northern English dialect; see skate3]

skite


Past participle: skited
Gerund: skiting

Imperative
skite
skite
Present
I skite
you skite
he/she/it skites
we skite
you skite
they skite
Preterite
I skited
you skited
he/she/it skited
we skited
you skited
they skited
Present Continuous
I am skiting
you are skiting
he/she/it is skiting
we are skiting
you are skiting
they are skiting
Present Perfect
I have skited
you have skited
he/she/it has skited
we have skited
you have skited
they have skited
Past Continuous
I was skiting
you were skiting
he/she/it was skiting
we were skiting
you were skiting
they were skiting
Past Perfect
I had skited
you had skited
he/she/it had skited
we had skited
you had skited
they had skited
Future
I will skite
you will skite
he/she/it will skite
we will skite
you will skite
they will skite
Future Perfect
I will have skited
you will have skited
he/she/it will have skited
we will have skited
you will have skited
they will have skited
Future Continuous
I will be skiting
you will be skiting
he/she/it will be skiting
we will be skiting
you will be skiting
they will be skiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been skiting
you have been skiting
he/she/it has been skiting
we have been skiting
you have been skiting
they have been skiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been skiting
you will have been skiting
he/she/it will have been skiting
we will have been skiting
you will have been skiting
they will have been skiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been skiting
you had been skiting
he/she/it had been skiting
we had been skiting
you had been skiting
they had been skiting
Conditional
I would skite
you would skite
he/she/it would skite
we would skite
you would skite
they would skite
Past Conditional
I would have skited
you would have skited
he/she/it would have skited
we would have skited
you would have skited
they would have skited
References in periodicals archive ?
SKITE incorporates providing trust value by using pair wise shared secret key along with trust based secured session management such that node with higher trust value can communicate only with node of equivalent of higher trust value and not with a node of lower trust value.
McManus, who first won the the Irish National in 1983 with Bit Of A Skite, said: "With AP not available we were delighted to get Barry.
For winning owner McManus, it was a third triumph in the race, after Bit Of A Skite (1983) and Butler's Cabin.
Harsh to say, but the only person at fault is the bloke who downed enough skite to kill Ollie Reed.
And so they skite off boulders, smash into trees and thump into gravel as they career wildly down the mountain slope.
En 1977-1978, le hieromoine Gregoire (Papazian), Armenien originaire d'Egypte, decide de construire a Rawdon un skite (ermitage), avec une petite chapelle adjacente dediee a la Transfiguration de Jesus-Christ.
Em um marcante festival de Still acts (paragens) em 1992 em Paris, Skite, alguns coreografos europeus expuseram a sua necessidade de optar por esse gesto de recusa do movimento como uma relacao com os fenomenos politicos recentes--a Guerra da Bosnia, por exemplo--, que os impediam de expandi-lo.
Maybe she couldn't figure out how to turn the machine off either - or perhaps the embarrassment of watching me skite right off the back of the treadmill was incentive enough for her to keep on running.
I continually skite of the beauty of Cairns area and you will understand my enthusiasm when you arrive and enjoy our tropical colours and gardens.
The important thing in any language is vocabulary ( if you know the nouns and the adjectives you can skite round the verbs.
ANIMALS, INSECTS AND BIRDS: cleck 'to hatch', cleg 'a gadfly, horse-fly', cloe 'to claw', gait 'a boar, hog', gimmer 'a kind of a ewe', ginners 'the gills of a fish', hagworm 'an adder or viper', inmeat 'the internal parts or viscera of an animal which are used for food', lop 'a flea', maw 'a gull', mawk 'a maggot', rawn/rown 'the roe of a fish', skite 'to void excrement', steg 'a gander', tyke 'a dog, a mongrel', waithing 'fishing', yure 'an udder';