sky surfing


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sky surfing

parachuting from an airplane with a board attached to one’s feet

sky′ surf`ing



n.
1. the sport of jumping from an airplane with a small board attached to one's feet, so that one can ride the air currents and do stunts before opening a parachute.
[1970–75]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Jamaica jump TODDLA T Sky Surfing Feat Wayne Marshall Good times bounce high and free in this uproarious Jamaican-recorded mash-up between Sheffield maestro Toddla and Kingston king Wayne Marshall.
Next ICOd like to try sky surfing, and I want to jump out of hot air balloons.
CX Online is especially geared to students, with a daily student news page highlighting hot careers like physician assistant as well as recreation ideas, like sky surfing; a career finder that uses a series of questions to match skills and interests with career ideas: and information on careers that includes detailed descriptions, quotes from people in the field, job outlooks and salary ranges, and hyperlinks to educational institutions and associations in the field, publications, and other helpful sites.
The number of pages dedicated to extreme sports in holiday brochures and on the Internet is increasing rapidly, where glossy pictures show tanned muscle men sky surfing.
JERRY Loftis, aged 29, who helped pioneer sky surfing fell to his death when his parachute failed to open properly during the World Free Fall Convention at Baldwin Field, outside Quincy, Illinois.
They created the thrill-jock equivalent of MTV, taking street sports like in-line skating, sky surfing, and - in winter - snowboarding - and fashioning them into the hip, 'tude-laden "Extreme Games," comprised of events that move so fast the name had to be shortened to "X-Games."
Some people need to go bungee jumping or sky surfing to feel alive, and will go to great lengths to find the sensations they crave - things other people cannot see the point of.
Faced with a saturation of conventional sports programming in mature markets, ESPN's Steve Bornstein looks for growth on the information superhighway; outside the U.S.; and in a second network that covers bungee jumping, sky surfing, and beach volleyball--the sports of a younger generation marked by a single letter.
How did they come to excel at sport climbing, street luge, sky surfing or bungee jumping?