slack off


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Related to slack off: roughshod, up to par

slack 1

 (slăk)
adj. slack·er, slack·est
1. Not tense or taut; loose: a slack rope; slack muscles. See Synonyms at loose.
2.
a. Lacking in activity; not busy: a slack season for the travel business.
b. Moving slowly; sluggish: a slack pace.
3. Lacking in diligence or due care or concern; negligent: a slack worker. See Synonyms at negligent.
4. Flowing or blowing with little speed: a slack current; slack winds.
5. Linguistics Pronounced with the muscles of the tongue and jaw relatively relaxed; lax.
v. slacked, slack·ing, slacks
v.tr.
1.
a. To make looser or less taut: slacked the sail.
b. To make slower: slacked our pace.
2. To be careless or remiss in doing: slack one's duty.
3. To slake (lime).
v.intr.
1. To be or become slack.
2. To be inactive or avoid work: slacked around the house all day.
n.
1. A loose part, as of a rope or sail: hauled in the slack.
2. A period of little activity; a lull: a slack in business.
3.
a. A cessation of movement in a current of air or water.
b. An area of still water.
4. Unused capacity: still some slack in the economy.
5. slacks Casual pants that are not part of a suit.
adv.
In a slack manner: a banner hanging slack.
Phrasal Verb:
slack off
1. To decrease in activity or intensity.
2. To work less intensely than is required or expected: slacked off at work and started surfing the internet.
Idiom:
cut/give (someone) some slack
Slang To make an allowance for (someone), as in allowing more time to finish something.

[Middle English slak, from Old English slæc; see slēg- in Indo-European roots.]

slack′ly adv.
slack′ness n.

slack 2

 (slăk)
n.
A mixture of coal fragments, coal dust, and dirt that remains after screening coal.

[Middle English sleck.]

slack 3

 (slăk)
n. Chiefly British
1. A small dell or hollow.
2. A bog; a morass.

[Middle English slak, from Old Norse slakki.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.slack off - become less in amount or intensityslack off - become less in amount or intensity; "The storm abated"; "The rain let up after a few hours"
decrease, diminish, lessen, fall - decrease in size, extent, or range; "The amount of homework decreased towards the end of the semester"; "The cabin pressure fell dramatically"; "her weight fell to under a hundred pounds"; "his voice fell to a whisper"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

slack

adjective
1. Characterized by reduced economic activity:
2. Not tautly bound, held, or fastened:
3. Guilty of neglect; lacking due care or concern:
verb
1. To reduce in tension, pressure, or rigidity:
2. To avoid the fulfillment of:
Idiom: let slide.
phrasal verb
slack off
To become or cause to become less active or intense:
abate, bate, die (away, down, off, or out), ease (off or up), ebb, fall, fall off, lapse, let up, moderate, remit, slacken, subside, wane.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
But this afternoon--perhaps on account of music--he perceived that one must slack off occasionally, or what is the good of being alive?
At first I inclined to slack off sail and beat about till the fog was lifted.
A veer in the wind induced them to slack off sheets, and five minutes afterward a sudden veer from the opposite quarter caught all three schooners aback, and those on shore could see the boom-tackles being slacked away or cast off on the jump.
SWIMMING: Craig Benson admits he can't afford to slack off at all if he's to make a third and final Olympics.
Women also have a part to play in this, but more often than not, men think they can slack off now that they've gotten you married.
"The manager would never let us slack off and that's what you need - someone to keep you going.
He also believes his 2000 squad have too much professional pride to slack off at this stage.
It was important to come here and not to slack off."
And while Nuno is thrilled to be in Group K with Besiktas, Braga and Slovan Bratislava, he knows they cannot slack off against Everton tomorrow.
If other teams think that Ateneo would slack off after clinching a Final Four spot, the rest of the league should've thought otherwise.
I know I've got to get past them first and that's why I've got to perform in training everyday and I can't slack off."
And then they slack off, showing the same rates of absenteeism and sick leave.