slang


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slang

 (slăng)
n.
1. A kind of language occurring chiefly in casual and playful speech, made up typically of coinages and figures of speech that are deliberately used in place of standard terms for added raciness, humor, irreverence, or other effect.
2. Language peculiar to a group; argot or jargon: thieves' slang.
v. slanged, slang·ing, slangs
v.intr.
1. To use slang.
2. To use angry and abusive language: persuaded the parties to quit slanging and come to the bargaining table.
v.tr.
To attack with abusive language; vituperate: "They slanged each other with every foul name they had learned from the age of three" (Virginia Henley).

[Origin unknown.]

slang′i·ly adv.
slang′i·ness n.
slang′y adj.

slang

(slæŋ)
n
1. (Linguistics)
a. vocabulary, idiom, etc, that is not appropriate to the standard form of a language or to formal contexts, may be restricted as to social status or distribution, and is characteristically more metaphorical and transitory than standard language
b. (as modifier): a slang word.
2. (Linguistics) another word for jargon1
vb
to abuse (someone) with vituperative language; insult
[C18: of unknown origin]
ˈslangy adj
ˈslangily adv
ˈslanginess n

slang

(slæŋ)

n.
1. very informal usage in vocabulary and idiom that is characteristically more metaphorical, playful, elliptical, vivid, and ephemeral than ordinary language.
2. speech or writing characterized by the use of vulgar and socially taboo vocabulary and idiomatic expressions.
3. the jargon of a particular group, profession, etc.
4. argot; cant.
v.i.
5. to use slang or abusive language.
v.t.
6. to assail with abusive language.
[1750–60; orig. uncertain]
slang′i•ly, adv.
slang′i•ness, n.
slang′y, adj. slang•i•er, slang•i•est.

slang


Past participle: slanged
Gerund: slanging

Imperative
slang
slang
Present
I slang
you slang
he/she/it slangs
we slang
you slang
they slang
Preterite
I slanged
you slanged
he/she/it slanged
we slanged
you slanged
they slanged
Present Continuous
I am slanging
you are slanging
he/she/it is slanging
we are slanging
you are slanging
they are slanging
Present Perfect
I have slanged
you have slanged
he/she/it has slanged
we have slanged
you have slanged
they have slanged
Past Continuous
I was slanging
you were slanging
he/she/it was slanging
we were slanging
you were slanging
they were slanging
Past Perfect
I had slanged
you had slanged
he/she/it had slanged
we had slanged
you had slanged
they had slanged
Future
I will slang
you will slang
he/she/it will slang
we will slang
you will slang
they will slang
Future Perfect
I will have slanged
you will have slanged
he/she/it will have slanged
we will have slanged
you will have slanged
they will have slanged
Future Continuous
I will be slanging
you will be slanging
he/she/it will be slanging
we will be slanging
you will be slanging
they will be slanging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been slanging
you have been slanging
he/she/it has been slanging
we have been slanging
you have been slanging
they have been slanging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been slanging
you will have been slanging
he/she/it will have been slanging
we will have been slanging
you will have been slanging
they will have been slanging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been slanging
you had been slanging
he/she/it had been slanging
we had been slanging
you had been slanging
they had been slanging
Conditional
I would slang
you would slang
he/she/it would slang
we would slang
you would slang
they would slang
Past Conditional
I would have slanged
you would have slanged
he/she/it would have slanged
we would have slanged
you would have slanged
they would have slanged

slang

Language that is not appropriate in formal contexts, often deliberately used in place of formal terms by a particular group of people .
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slang - informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasionsslang - informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions; often vituperative or vulgar; "their speech was full of slang expressions"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
2.slang - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
nookie, nooky, piece of tail, roll in the hay, screwing, screw - slang for sexual intercourse
hand job - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
bunghole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
sheeny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
ginzo, greaseball, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
airhead - a flighty scatterbrained simpleton; "she's a total airhead"; "every airhead on a big salary rushed out to buy one"
babe, sister, baby - (slang) sometimes used as a term of address for attractive young women
bad egg - (old-fashioned slang) a bad person
boffin - (British slang) a scientist or technician engaged in military research
good egg - (old-fashioned slang) a good person
guvnor - (British slang) boss
old man - (slang) boss
out-and-outer - someone who is excellent at something
Verb1.slang - use slang or vulgar language
speak, talk - use language; "the baby talks already"; "the prisoner won't speak"; "they speak a strange dialect"
2.slang - fool or hoaxslang - fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone"; "You can't fool me!"
kid, pull the leg of - tell false information to for fun; "Are you pulling my leg?"
deceive, lead astray, betray - cause someone to believe an untruth; "The insurance company deceived me when they told me they were covering my house"
3.slang - abuse with coarse language
blackguard, clapperclaw, abuse, shout - use foul or abusive language towards; "The actress abused the policeman who gave her a parking ticket"; "The angry mother shouted at the teacher"

slang

noun colloquialisms, jargon, idioms, argot, informal language He liked to think he kept up with current slang.
Translations
عَامِّيَةكَلِمات وتعابير عاميَّهيَتَكَلَّم بوقاحَةٍ وغَضَب
slangnadávat
slangskælde ud
slangi
argotslang
sleng
szidalmazszleng
slangurúthúîa
俗語
속어
dergtikoneveiktislengas
gānītlamātlamātiesslengsžargons
slang
sleng
slang
ภาษาสแลง
argoargo konuşmakküfretmek
tiếng lóng

slang

[slæŋ]
A. N (gen) → argot m, jerga f; [of a group, trade etc] → jerga f
to talk slanghablar en argot or jerga
that word is slangesa palabra es del argot
B. ADJargótico, jergal
slang wordpalabra f del argot, palabra f argótica or jergal
C. VT (= insult, criticize) → poner verde a, injuriar
a slanging matchuna disputa a voces

slang

[ˈslæŋ]
nargot m
military slang → argot militaire
modif [term, word] → argotiqueslanging match [ˈslæŋɪŋmætʃ] n (British)prise f de bec
to have a slanging match → avoir une prise de bec

slang

nSlang m; (= army slang, schoolboy slang etc)Jargon m; street slangStraßenjargon m; gipsy slangZigeunersprache f (neg!)
adjSlang-; slang expressionSlangausdruck m
vt (esp Brit inf) to slang somebodyjdn beschimpfen; to slang somethingüber etw (acc)schimpfen

slang

[slæŋ]
1. n (gen) → slang m inv, gergo
school/army slang → gergo studentesco/militare
to talk slang → parlare in gergo
2. adj (word) → gergale
3. vt (fam) (insult, criticize) → dirne di tutti i colori a

slang

(slӕŋ) noun
words and phrases (often in use for only a short time) used very informally, eg words used mainly by, and typical of, a particular group. army slang; teenage slang; `stiff' is slang for `a corpse'.
verb
to speak rudely and angrily to or about (someone); to abuse. I got furious when he started slanging my mother.

slang

عَامِّيَة slang slang Slang αργκό jerga slangi argot sleng gergo 俗語 속어 slang slang slang calão, gíria сленг slang ภาษาสแลง argo tiếng lóng 俚语
References in classic literature ?
"Are you beginning to dislike slang, then?" said Rosamond, with mild gravity.
Morris doesn't always speak slang, that is to say, he never does so to strangers or before them, for he is really well educated and has exquisite manners, but he found out that it amused me to hear him talk American slang,and whenever I was present, and there was no one to be shocked, he said such funny things.
"You have just shown us one of the chief evils, and that is slang," answered their mother quickly.
In merely resuming his own the author hopes to be held guiltless by those to whom the work is addressed -- enlightened souls who prefer dry wines to sweet, sense to sentiment, wit to humor and clean English to slang.
"An appeal will not lie," he thought, with an absurd reversion to professional slang, making the situation more horrible, as the fire of a cigar might light up a tomb.
He seemed to express himself with difficulty, as though words were not the medium with which his mind worked; and you had to guess the intentions of his soul by hackneyed phrases, slang, and vague, unfinished gestures.
And although the French word for shoemaker is different now, there is still a slang word chausseur, meaning a cobbler.
The slang men, not a very musical race, still clung to the goat's horn trumpet and the Gothic rubebbe of the twelfth century.
She would not say she was charmed to meet Miss Pink--the ordinary slang of society was not for Miss Pink's ears--she would say she felt this introduction as a privilege.
"I'll try not to use slang since Cecily doesn't like it," wrote Dan.
Among our still more modern and dashing young gentlemen -- who are extremely averse to superfluous effort and supremely indifferent to the purity of their native language -- the formula is still further curtailed by the use of "to feel" in a technical sense, meaning, "to recommend-for-the-purposes-of-feeling-and-being-felt"; and at this moment the "slang" of polite or fast society in the upper classes sanctions such a barbarism as "Mr.
"It isn't Bill, it's Billina; and you're talking slang, which is very undig'n'fied," said Dorothy, reprovingly.