slangy


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slang

 (slăng)
n.
1. A kind of language occurring chiefly in casual and playful speech, made up typically of coinages and figures of speech that are deliberately used in place of standard terms for added raciness, humor, irreverence, or other effect.
2. Language peculiar to a group; argot or jargon: thieves' slang.
v. slanged, slang·ing, slangs
v.intr.
1. To use slang.
2. To use angry and abusive language: persuaded the parties to quit slanging and come to the bargaining table.
v.tr.
To attack with abusive language; vituperate: "They slanged each other with every foul name they had learned from the age of three" (Virginia Henley).

[Origin unknown.]

slang′i·ly adv.
slang′i·ness n.
slang′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slangy - constituting or expressed in slang or given to the use of slang; "a slangy expression"; "slangy speech"
informal - used of spoken and written language
Translations

slangy

[ˈslæŋɪ] ADJ (slangier (compar) (slangiest (superl))) [person] → que usa mucho argot, que usa mucha jerga; [style etc] → argótico, jergal

slangy

[ˈslæŋi] adjargotique

slangy

adj (+er), slangily
advsalopp

slangy

[ˈslæŋɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) → gergale
References in classic literature ?
They take with them a quantity of food, and when the commissary department fails they "skirmish," as Jack terms it in his sinful, slangy way.
And there's nothing rude or slangy in what she does say.
I can't help being a bit slangy. You do take everything so seriously.
Mr Pickering did not put it so to himself, for he was rarely slangy even in thought, but what he felt was that he had caught The Man and his confederate with the goods.
"Don't be idiotic, and, above all, don't be slangy! Of course, candidly."
And that night, coming out of the cannery, he was interviewed by his fellow workmen, who were very angry and incoherently slangy. He failed to comprehend the motive behind their action.
Sometimes her prose becomes suddenly informal and slangy, as when she uses the phrase "he got it in spades." Sometime she ignores the life of Chaucer and sometimes the book sounds like a transcript of an undergraduate survey course in literature.
A writer's voice -- Grace Paley at her slangy best, Nicholson Baker at his hypomanic craziest -- starts to seep in and colour the voice of your innermost thoughts.
3, 2013, Cairo, Egypt), inspired generations of Egyptians with his slangy, sometimes crude poems in which he described the struggles of the working class and lampooned the excesses of Egypt's political leaders.
At times Ferry's word choices are "high" in tone, as when he uses "Aeneadae" (IX.226) instead of "the followers of Aeneas." On the other hand, bursts of (often awkward) contractions randomly lower the tone of other passages, as do slangy, off-key phrases such as "Call up a meeting" (XI.489).
Trudeau could also have profited from better proofreading, to exclude such "slangy" expressions as "put his dibs in," and other grammatical missteps--(principle for principal, "to essentially drop").
Berlin Alexanderplatz is a beautiful, funny mess of a novel, a talking made text without losing any of its slangy jazz.