slapstick

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Related to slapsticks: Slapstick Humor, Slapstick humour

slap·stick

 (slăp′stĭk′)
n.
1. A boisterous form of comedy marked by sight gags and absurd or violent mishaps or pranks, such as slipping on a banana peel.
2. A paddle designed to produce a loud whacking sound, formerly used by performers in farces.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

slapstick

(ˈslæpˌstɪk)
n
1. (Theatre)
a. comedy characterized by horseplay and physical action
b. (as modifier): slapstick humour.
2. (Theatre) a flexible pair of paddles bound together at one end, formerly used in pantomime to strike a blow to a person with a loud clapping sound but without injury
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

slap•stick

(ˈslæpˌstɪk)

n.
1. broad comedy characterized by violently boisterous action.
2. a stick or lath used by comic performers or characters for striking other persons, esp. a pair of laths that produce a loud noise without causing injury.
adj.
3. using, or marked by slapstick: a slapstick routine.
[1895–1900, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slapstick - a boisterous comedy with chases and collisions and practical jokesslapstick - a boisterous comedy with chases and collisions and practical jokes
comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
2.slapstick - acoustic device consisting of two paddles hinged together; used by an actor to make a loud noise without inflicting injury when striking someone
acoustic device - a device for amplifying or transmitting sound
Adj.1.slapstick - characterized by horseplay and physical action; "slapstick style of humor"
humorous, humourous - full of or characterized by humor; "humorous stories"; "humorous cartoons"; "in a humorous vein"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

slapstick

noun farce, horseplay, buffoonery, knockabout comedy inspired bursts of slapstick
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
هَزلِيّات تَعتَمِد على المقالِب
fraškafraškovitý
falde-på-halen-komedielagkage-
gaguesque
vígjáték
ærslaleikur
şaklabanlığa dayanan komedi

slapstick

[ˈslæpstɪk] N (also slapstick comedy) → bufonada f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

slapstick

[ˈslæpstɪk] n (also slapstick comedy) → comédie f tarte à la crèmeslap-up meal n (British)gueuleton m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

slapstick

[ˈslæpˌstɪk] n (also slapstick comedy) → farsa grossolana
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

slap

(slӕp) noun
a blow with the palm of the hand or anything flat. The child got a slap from his mother for being rude.
verbpast tense, past participle slapped
to give a slap to. He slapped my face.
ˌslapˈdash adjective
careless and hurried. He does everything in such a slapdash manner.
ˌslap-ˈhappy adjective
cheerfully careless; carefree. she cooks in a very slap-happy way.
ˈslapstick noun
a kind of humour which depends for its effect on very simple practical jokes etc. Throwing custard pies turns a play into slapstick; (also adjective) slapstick comedy.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
She is a good match for the energetic Stephanie Plum, who slapsticks her way through detection and crime fighting no matter how many of her cars are blown up or employers' businesses she burns down.
The piece is not alien to the choreographer's style, however: from 1977 to 1991, Eifman created one-act dramas, parables, comedies, slapsticks, and even rock ballets for younger audiences.