slave

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Related to slaves: Slavic, Slavs, Chattel slavery

slave

 (slāv)
n.
1. One who is owned as the property of someone else, especially in involuntary servitude.
2. One who is subservient to or controlled by another: his boss's slave.
3. One who is subject to or controlled by a specified influence: a slave to alcohol; a slave to an irrational fear.
4. One who works extremely hard.
5. One who acts out the role of the submissive partner in a sadomasochistic relationship.
6. A slave ant.
7. A machine or component controlled by another machine or component.
intr.v. slaved, slav·ing, slaves
1. To work very hard or doggedly; toil.
2. To trade in or transport slaves.
3. To cause a machine or component to be controlled by another machine or component.

[Middle English sclave, from Old French esclave, from Medieval Latin sclāvus, from Sclāvus, Slav (from the widespread enslavement of captured Slavs in the early Middle Ages); see Slav.]
Word History: The derivation of the word slave encapsulates a bit of European history and explains why the two words slave and Slav are so similar; they are, in fact, historically identical. The word slave first appears in English around 1290, spelled sclave. The spelling is based on Old French esclave from Medieval Latin sclavus, "Slav, slave," first recorded around 800. Sclavus comes from Byzantine Greek sklabos (pronounced sklä′vōs) "Slav," which appears around 580. Sklavos approximates the Slavs' own name for themselves, the Slověnci, surviving in English Slovene and Slovenian. The spelling of English slave, closer to its original Slavic form, first appears in English in the 1500s. Slavs became slaves around the beginning of the ninth century when the Holy Roman Empire tried to stabilize a German-Slav frontier. By the 1100s, stabilization had given way to wars of expansion and extermination that did not end until 1410, when the Poles crushed the knights of the Teutonic Order at Grunwald in north-central Poland. · As far as the Slavs' own self-designation goes, its meaning is, understandably, better than "slave"; it comes from the Indo-European root *kleu-, whose basic meaning is "to hear" and occurs in many derivatives meaning "renown, fame." The Slavs are thus "the famous people." Slavic names ending in -slav incorporate the same word, such as Czech Bohu-slav, "God's fame," Russian Msti-slav, "vengeful fame," and Polish Stani-slaw, "famous for withstanding (enemies)."

slave

(sleɪv)
n
1. (Law) a person legally owned by another and having no freedom of action or right to property
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a person who is forced to work for another against his will
3. a person under the domination of another person or some habit or influence: a slave to television.
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a person who works in harsh conditions for low pay
5. (Mechanical Engineering)
a. a device that is controlled by or that duplicates the action of another similar device (the master device)
b. (as modifier): slave cylinder.
vb
6. (often foll by: away) to work like a slave
7. (tr) an archaic word for enslave
[C13: via Old French from Medieval Latin Sclāvus a Slav, one held in bondage (from the fact that the Slavonic races were frequently conquered in the Middle Ages), from Late Greek Sklabos a Slav]

slave

(sleɪv)

n., v. slaved, slav•ing. n.
1. a person who is the property of and wholly subject to another; bond servant.
2. a person entirely under the domination of some influence or person.
3. a drudge: a housekeeping slave.
4. a mechanism under control of and repeating the actions of a similar mechanism. Compare master (def. 17).
v.i.
5. to work like a slave; drudge.
6. to engage in the slave trade.
v.t.
7. Archaic. to enslave.
[1250–1300; Middle English sclave < Medieval Latin sclāvus (masculine), sclāva (feminine) slave, orig., Slav; so called because Slavs were commonly enslaved in the early Middle Ages]

slave

  • amanuensis - Literally "slave at hand"—for a literary assistant, especially one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.
  • ciao - Also ciau; from Italian, it is an alteration of schiavo, "(I am your) slave."
  • serve - From Latin servire, "serve," from servus, "slave."
  • addict - To addict originally meant "to award as a slave"; an addict now is a slave to his/her habit, from Latin addictus, which, in Roman law, meant "a debtor awarded as a slave to his creditor."

slave


Past participle: slaved
Gerund: slaving

Imperative
slave
slave
Present
I slave
you slave
he/she/it slaves
we slave
you slave
they slave
Preterite
I slaved
you slaved
he/she/it slaved
we slaved
you slaved
they slaved
Present Continuous
I am slaving
you are slaving
he/she/it is slaving
we are slaving
you are slaving
they are slaving
Present Perfect
I have slaved
you have slaved
he/she/it has slaved
we have slaved
you have slaved
they have slaved
Past Continuous
I was slaving
you were slaving
he/she/it was slaving
we were slaving
you were slaving
they were slaving
Past Perfect
I had slaved
you had slaved
he/she/it had slaved
we had slaved
you had slaved
they had slaved
Future
I will slave
you will slave
he/she/it will slave
we will slave
you will slave
they will slave
Future Perfect
I will have slaved
you will have slaved
he/she/it will have slaved
we will have slaved
you will have slaved
they will have slaved
Future Continuous
I will be slaving
you will be slaving
he/she/it will be slaving
we will be slaving
you will be slaving
they will be slaving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been slaving
you have been slaving
he/she/it has been slaving
we have been slaving
you have been slaving
they have been slaving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been slaving
you will have been slaving
he/she/it will have been slaving
we will have been slaving
you will have been slaving
they will have been slaving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been slaving
you had been slaving
he/she/it had been slaving
we had been slaving
you had been slaving
they had been slaving
Conditional
I would slave
you would slave
he/she/it would slave
we would slave
you would slave
they would slave
Past Conditional
I would have slaved
you would have slaved
he/she/it would have slaved
we would have slaved
you would have slaved
they would have slaved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slave - a person who is owned by someoneslave - a person who is owned by someone  
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
bondsman, bondman - a male slave
bondmaid, bondwoman, bondswoman - a female slave
bond servant - someone bound to labor without wages
puppet, tool, creature - a person who is controlled by others and is used to perform unpleasant or dishonest tasks for someone else
galley slave - a slave condemned to row in a galley
3.slave - someone entirely dominated by some influence or person; "a slave to fashion"; "a slave to cocaine"; "his mother was his abject slave"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Verb1.slave - work very hard, like a slave
do work, work - be employed; "Is your husband working again?"; "My wife never worked"; "Do you want to work after the age of 60?"; "She never did any work because she inherited a lot of money"; "She works as a waitress to put herself through college"

slave

noun
1. servant, serf, vassal, bondsman, slavey (Brit. informal), varlet (archaic), villein, bondservant still living as slaves in the desert
2. drudge, skivvy (chiefly Brit.), scullion (archaic) Mum says to Dad, `I'm not your slave, you know!'

slave

noun
One who works or toils tirelessly:
Informal: grind, workhorse.
verb
To do tedious, laborious, and sometimes menial work:
Informal: grind.
Translations
عَبْديَعْمَلُ عن غَيْرِه عملا شاقّايُكَدِّحُ
otrokotročit-yně
slavetræl
orjaraataa
robrobovati
agyondolgozza magátrabszolga
hamba
òrælaòrællvinnuòræll
奴隷奴隷のように働くスレーブ
노예혹사하다
vergasvergautivergovėvergvaldystė
vergsvergot
otročiťotrok
suženj
slavslavasexslav
ทาสทำงานอย่างหนัก
köleköle gibi çalışmakköle gibi çalışan
làm việc như nô lệnô lệ

slave

[sleɪv]
A. Nesclavo/a m/f
to be a slave to sth (fig) → ser esclavo de algo
to be a slave to tobaccoser esclavo del tabaco
to be a slave to dutyser esclavo del deber
B. VI to slave (away) at sth/at doing sthtrabajar como un negro en algo/haciendo algo
C. CPD slave driver Nnegrero/a m/f (fig) → tirano/a m/f
slave labour N (= work) → trabajo m de esclavos; (= persons) → esclavos mpl
slave trade Ntrata f de esclavos, comercio m de esclavos, tráfico m de esclavos
slave trader Ntraficante mf en esclavos

slave

[ˈsleɪv]
n
(lit)esclave mf
(fig)esclave
to be a slave to sth [+ fashion, convention, work] → être l'esclave de qch
vi (= work very hard) → trimer, travailler comme un forçat
to slave over a hot stove → trimer aux fourneaux
slave away
vitrimer, travailler comme un forçat
to slave away at sth → se tuer à qch
to slave away at doing sth → se tuer à faire qchslave driver n (pejorative)négrier/ière m/fslave labour (British) slave labor (US) n
(lit)travail m des esclaves
built by slave labour → construit(e) grâce au travail des esclaves
based on slave labour → fondé(e) sur le travail des esclaves
(fig)esclavage m
it's just slave labour → c'est de l'esclavage

slave

nSklave m, → Sklavin f; to be a slave to somebody/somethingjds Sklave/Sklave von etw sein
visich abplagen, schuften (inf); to slave (away) at somethingsich mit etw herumschlagen; to slave over a hot stove(den ganzen Tag) am Herd stehen; he was slaving over his homeworker schlug sich mit seinen Hausaufgaben herum

slave

:
slave-driver
n (lit, fig)Sklaventreiber(in) m(f)
slave labour, (US) slave labor
n
(= work)Sklavenarbeit f
(= work force)Sklaven pl; he uses slaveseine Leute müssen wie die Sklaven arbeiten
slave market
n (Hist) → Sklavenmarkt m

slave

:
slave ship
nSklavenschiff nt
slave trade
slave trader
n = slaver1

slave

[sleɪv]
1. nschiavo/a
to be a slave to sth (fig) → essere schiavo/a di qc
to be a slave of habit → essere schiavo/a delle abitudini
2. vi to slave (away) at sth/at doing sthsgobbare per qc/per fare qc

slave

(sleiv) noun
1. a person who works for a master to whom he belongs. In the nineteenth century many Africans were sold as slaves in the United States.
2. a person who works very hard for someone else. He has a slave who types his letters and organizes his life for him.
verb
to work very hard, often for another person. I've been slaving away for you all day while you sit and watch television.
ˈslavery noun
1. the state of being a slave.
2. the system of ownership of slaves.
3. very hard and badly-paid work. Her job is sheer slavery.

slave

عَبْد, يُكَدِّحُ otročit, otrok slave schuften, Sklave σκλάβος, σκλαβώνω esclavizar, esclavo orja, raataa esclave, trimer rob, robovati lavorare come uno schiavo, schiavo 奴隷, 奴隷のように働く 노예, 혹사하다 slaaf, uitsloven (zich) slave niewolnik, tyrać escravizar, escravo выполнять тяжелую работу, раб slav, slava ทาส, ทำงานอย่างหนัก köle, köle gibi çalışmak làm việc như nô lệ, nô lệ 奴隶, 辛勤努力
References in classic literature ?
In the slave quarters, and even later, I heard whispered conversations among the coloured people of the tortures which the slaves, including, no doubt, my ancestors on my mother's side, suffered in the middle passage of the slave ship while being conveyed from Africa to America.
There was no cooking-stove on our plantation, and all the cooking for the whites and slaves my mother had to do over an open fireplace, mostly in pots and "skillets." While the poorly built cabin caused us to suffer with cold in the winter, the heat from the open fireplace in summer was equally trying.
It may, perhaps, be fairly questioned, whether any other portion of the population of the earth could have endured the privations, sufferings and horrors of slavery, without having become more degraded in the scale of humanity than the slaves of African descent.
They do not deny that the slaves are held as prop- erty; but that terrible fact seems to convey to their minds no idea of injustice, exposure to outrage, or savage barbarity.
Then, taking the beautiful Persian, he returned home amidst the acclamations of the people, who detested Saouy so much that they would neither interfere in his behalf nor allow his slaves to protect him.
The man's stooped and narrow shoulders and weazened chest proclaimed him the true child of the crowded ghetto, and strong on Martin was the age-long struggle of the feeble, wretched slaves against the lordly handful of men who had ruled over them and would rule over them to the end of time.
If the mothers of the free states had all felt as they should, in times past, the sons of the free states would not have been the holders, and, proverbially, the hardest masters of slaves; the sons of the free states would not have connived at the extension of slavery, in our national body; the sons of the free states would not, as they do, trade the souls and bodies of men as an equivalent to money, in their mercantile dealings.
This ant is absolutely dependent on its slaves; without their aid, the species would certainly become extinct in a single year.
All this is admitted, it will perhaps be said; but does it follow, from an admission of numbers for the measure of representation, or of slaves combined with free citizens as a ratio of taxation, that slaves ought to be included in the numerical rule of representation?
When a family is complete, it consists of freemen and slaves; but as in every subject we should begin with examining into the smallest parts of which it consists, and as the first and smallest parts of a family are the master and slave, the husband and wife, the father and child, let us first inquire into these three, what each of them may be, and what they ought to be; that is to say, the herile, the nuptial, and the paternal.
"There was no witness but the slaves. They said the slave that was most valuable got free of his bonds and escaped in some strange way -- by magic arts
All relatives have correlatives: by the term 'slave' we mean the slave of a master, by the term 'master', the master of a slave; by 'double', the double of its hall; by 'half', the half of its double; by 'greater', greater than that which is less; by 'less,' less than that which is greater.