slavishness


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slav·ish

 (slā′vĭsh)
adj.
1. Of or characteristic of a slave or slavery; servile: Her slavish devotion to her job ruled her life.
2. Showing no originality; blindly imitative: a slavish copy of the original.

slav′ish·ly adv.
slav′ish·ness n.
Translations

slavishness

[ˈsleɪvɪʃnɪs] Nservilismo m

slavishness

nsklavische Abhängigkeit; (= submissiveness)Unterwürfigkeit f; the slavishness with which she imitated himdie sklavische Art, in der sie ihn nachahmte
References in classic literature ?
We accept this amiable slavishness, and praise a woman for it: we call this pretty treachery truth.
In the same way, he renders Uncle Alo a family dishonor through his claims of his unmanly slavishness in his conjugal life.
Indeed, this undue exaltation of the state authority curiously enough postulates a sort of servitude, of slavishness on the part of man.
The goal is to defeat Saraki, uproot all the abominable trees he has planted in our state and free our people from the subliminal state of slavishness. The time to do it is now and we must all work together to achieve this.
It was likewise a historic and patriotic feat for the President to declare the end of our neocolonial slavishness to the United States and the beginning of a foreign policy independent of US intervention.
(119) Rationality lifts us out of slavishness to our desires.
Many call it a sign of 'slavishness' traced to the colonial days.
"we have reached a third phase in historiography 'one which transcends the Eurocentric traditional slavishness to the written word and accepts that historical truth may be gleaned from oral history'" Miles, 1993 as cited in Bangura, 2011, p.
Goldman, Berkman, and Valkenburgh were livid that "Communist gangsters," whose leadership (on whatever gradation of slavishness to Moscow) "used the lives of Sacco and Vanzetti in order to gain prestige and glory" and furthered their own movement and its ends.
I would like to propose that Achilles (or, from another angle, Homer) invents this visit from Athena, and in so doing we see that ressentiment, rather than being the crowning virtue of a Christian slave morality, or even exclusively the root of modern humanitarian love, transforms slavishness into virtuous submission in the oldest poem known to the Western world.
Those alternatives are despotism and slavishness, ruling others as though they were slaves or living like a slave by preferring pleasure and wealth to what is truly good.