sledge

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sledge

 (slĕj)
n.
A vehicle mounted on runners drawn by work animals, such as horses or dogs, and used for transporting loads across ice, snow, and rough ground.
tr. & intr.v. sledged, sledg·ing, sledg·es
To convey or travel on a sledge.

[Dutch dialectal sleedse, perhaps diminutive of Dutch slede, sled, from Middle Dutch sledde.]

sledge

(slɛdʒ) or

sled

n
1. (Automotive Engineering) Also called: sleigh a vehicle mounted on runners, drawn by horses or dogs, for transporting people or goods, esp over snow
2. (Skiing) a light wooden frame used, esp by children, for sliding over snow; toboggan
3. (Automotive Engineering) NZ a farm vehicle mounted on runners, for use on rough or muddy ground
vb
(Automotive Engineering) to convey, travel, or go by sledge
[C17: from Middle Dutch sleedse; C14 sled, from Middle Low German, from Old Norse slethi, related to slide]

sledge

(slɛdʒ)
n
(Tools) short for sledgehammer

sledge

(slɛdʒ)
vb
(Cricket) (tr) to bait (an opponent, esp a batsman in cricket) in order to upset his or her concentration
n
(Cricket) an insult aimed at another player during a game of cricket
[of uncertain origin; perhaps from sledgehammer]

sledge1

(slɛdʒ)

n., v. sledged, sledg•ing. n.
1. a vehicle mounted on runners and often drawn by draft animals, used for traveling or for conveying loads over snow, ice, rough ground, etc.
2. a sled.
3. Brit. a sleigh.
v.t., v.i.
4. to convey or travel by sledge.
v.i.
5. Brit. to ride in a sleigh.
[1595–1605; < dial. Dutch sleeds, derivative of slede; see sled]

sledge2

(slɛdʒ)

n., v.t., v.i. sledged, sledg•ing.
[before 1000; Middle English slegge, Old English slecg, c. Middle Dutch, Dutch slegge, Old Norse sleggja; akin to slay]

sledge


Past participle: sledged
Gerund: sledging

Imperative
sledge
sledge
Present
I sledge
you sledge
he/she/it sledges
we sledge
you sledge
they sledge
Preterite
I sledged
you sledged
he/she/it sledged
we sledged
you sledged
they sledged
Present Continuous
I am sledging
you are sledging
he/she/it is sledging
we are sledging
you are sledging
they are sledging
Present Perfect
I have sledged
you have sledged
he/she/it has sledged
we have sledged
you have sledged
they have sledged
Past Continuous
I was sledging
you were sledging
he/she/it was sledging
we were sledging
you were sledging
they were sledging
Past Perfect
I had sledged
you had sledged
he/she/it had sledged
we had sledged
you had sledged
they had sledged
Future
I will sledge
you will sledge
he/she/it will sledge
we will sledge
you will sledge
they will sledge
Future Perfect
I will have sledged
you will have sledged
he/she/it will have sledged
we will have sledged
you will have sledged
they will have sledged
Future Continuous
I will be sledging
you will be sledging
he/she/it will be sledging
we will be sledging
you will be sledging
they will be sledging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sledging
you have been sledging
he/she/it has been sledging
we have been sledging
you have been sledging
they have been sledging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sledging
you will have been sledging
he/she/it will have been sledging
we will have been sledging
you will have been sledging
they will have been sledging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sledging
you had been sledging
he/she/it had been sledging
we had been sledging
you had been sledging
they had been sledging
Conditional
I would sledge
you would sledge
he/she/it would sledge
we would sledge
you would sledge
they would sledge
Past Conditional
I would have sledged
you would have sledged
he/she/it would have sledged
we would have sledged
you would have sledged
they would have sledged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sledge - a vehicle mounted on runners and pulled by horses or dogssledge - a vehicle mounted on runners and pulled by horses or dogs; for transportation over snow
bobsled, bobsleigh, bob - a long racing sled (for 2 or more people) with a steering mechanism
bobsled, bobsleigh - formerly two short sleds coupled together
dog sled, dog sleigh, dogsled - a sled pulled by dogs
luge - a racing sled for one or two people
pung - a one-horse sleigh consisting of a box on runners
runner - device consisting of the parts on which something can slide along
toboggan - a long narrow sled without runners; boards curve upward in front
vehicle - a conveyance that transports people or objects
2.sledge - a heavy long-handled hammer used to drive stakes or wedgessledge - a heavy long-handled hammer used to drive stakes or wedges
hammer - a hand tool with a heavy rigid head and a handle; used to deliver an impulsive force by striking
Verb1.sledge - transport in a sleigh
transport - move something or somebody around; usually over long distances
2.sledge - ride in or travel with a sledge; "the antarctic expedition sledged along the coastline"; "The children sledged all day by the lake"
journey, travel - undertake a journey or trip
3.sledge - beat with a sledgehammer
hammer - beat with or as if with a hammer; "hammer the metal flat"

sledge

noun
1. bobsleigh, sled (U.S. & Canad.), sleigh, toboggan She travelled 14,000 miles by sledge.
verb
1. bobsleigh, sled (U.S.), sleigh, toboggan We spent the afternoon making snowmen and sledging down the hill.

sledge

verb
To ride on a sled in the snow:
Translations
مِزْلَجَه، زَحافَة الجَليدمَزْلَقيَرْكَبُ المِزْلَجَه
sáněsáňkovat
slædekælkkælkekøre på slæde
rekikelkka
sanjke
szánszánkószánkózik
renna sér á sleîasleîi
そり
썰매
rogėsrogutėsvažinėtis rogutėmis
braukt ar kamanāmkamanas
sani
släde
เลื่อนหิมะขนาดใหญ่
xe trượt tuyết

sledge

2 [sledʒ]
A. Ntrineo m
B. VIir en trineo
C. VTtransportar por trineo, llevar en trineo

sledge

[ˈslɛdʒ] nluge f

sledge

, (esp US) sled
nSchlitten m

sledge(hammer)

nVorschlaghammer m; to use a sledgehammer to crack a nut (fig)mit Kanonen auf Spatzen schießen

sledge

[slɛdʒ]
1. n (also sled) → slitta
2. vi to go sledgingandare in slitta
to sledge down a hill → scendere in slitta giù per una collina

sledge

(sledʒ) noun
(also, especially American , sled (sled) ) a vehicle, usually with runners, made for sliding upon snow.
verb
to ride on a sledge. The children were sledging all afternoon.

sledge

مَزْلَق sáně slæde Schlitten έλκηθρο trineo reki traîneau sanjke slitta そり 썰매 slee slegge sanie trenó сани släde เลื่อนหิมะขนาดใหญ่ kızak xe trượt tuyết 雪橇
References in classic literature ?
During the winter, when the trains are blocked up by the snow, these sledges make extremely rapid journeys across the frozen plains from one station to another.
If the wind held good, the distance might be traversed in five hours; if no accident happened the sledge might reach Omaha by one o'clock.
Peter and Pavel drove in the groom's sledge, and six sledges followed with all his relatives and friends.
There, in the market-place, some of the boldest of the boys used to tie their sledges to the carts as they passed by, and so they were pulled along, and got a good ride.
By that time Nikita had put the collar and brass-studded belly-band on Mukhorty and, carrying a light, painted shaft-bow in one hand, was leading the horse with the other up to two sledges that stood in the shed.
Rows of carriages, sledges, drivers, and policemen were standing in the approach.
When the sledges had gone she went up the path in her white dogskin coat.
We perceived a low carriage, fixed on a sledge and drawn by dogs, pass on towards the north, at the distance of half a mile; a being which had the shape of a man, but apparently of gigantic stature, sat in the sledge and guided the dogs.
So he placed his daughter in a sledge, not even daring to give her a horse-cloth to keep herself warm with, and drove her out on to the bare, open fields, where he kissed her and left her, driving home as fast as he could, that he might not witness her miserable death.
Starting on their feet, and snatching up their rifles, they beheld in dismay their horses and mules already in possession of the enemy, who had stolen upon the camp unperceived, while they were spell-bound by the magic of old sledge.
I made a rush for the roughly made sledge; but as soon as I raised my foot to get into it, the recollection of how Simonov had just given me six roubles seemed to double me up and I tumbled into the sledge like a sack.
Ethan therefore proposed to his assistant that they should load the sledge at the wood-lot, as they had done on the previous morning, and put off the "teaming" to Starkfield till later in the day.