sleeve


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sleeve

 (slēv)
n.
1. A part of a garment that covers all or part of an arm.
2. A case into which an object or device fits: a record sleeve.
3. A tattoo that covers all or a large part of the arm.
tr.v. sleeved, sleev·ing, sleeves
To furnish or fit with sleeves or a sleeve.
Idiom:
up (one's) sleeve
Hidden but ready to be used: I still have a few tricks up my sleeve.

[Middle English sleve, from Old English slēf; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

sleeve′less adj.

sleeve

(sliːv)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) the part of a garment covering the arm
2. (Mechanical Engineering) a tubular piece that is forced or shrunk into a cylindrical bore to reduce the diameter of the bore or to line it with a different material; liner
3. (Mechanical Engineering) a tube fitted externally over two cylindrical parts in order to join them; bush
4. (Electronics) a flat cardboard or plastic container to protect a gramophone record. US name: jacket
5. roll up one's sleeves to prepare oneself for work, a fight, etc
6. up one's sleeve secretly ready
vb
(tr) to provide with a sleeve or sleeves
[Old English slīf, slēf; related to Dutch sloof apron]
ˈsleeveless adj
ˈsleeveˌlike adj

sleeve

(sliv)

n., v. sleeved, sleev•ing. n.
1. the part of a garment that covers all or part of the arm.
2. an envelope, usu. of paper, for protecting a phonograph record.
3. a tubular piece, as of metal, fitting over a rod or the like.
v.t.
4. to furnish with sleeves.
Idioms:
up one's sleeve, kept hidden, esp. for future use against another.
[before 950; Middle English sleve, Old English slēfe (Anglian), slīefe, akin to Frisian (East) slēwe sleeve, Middle Dutch sloove covering]
sleeve′less, adj.

sleeve


Past participle: sleeved
Gerund: sleeving

Imperative
sleeve
sleeve
Present
I sleeve
you sleeve
he/she/it sleeves
we sleeve
you sleeve
they sleeve
Preterite
I sleeved
you sleeved
he/she/it sleeved
we sleeved
you sleeved
they sleeved
Present Continuous
I am sleeving
you are sleeving
he/she/it is sleeving
we are sleeving
you are sleeving
they are sleeving
Present Perfect
I have sleeved
you have sleeved
he/she/it has sleeved
we have sleeved
you have sleeved
they have sleeved
Past Continuous
I was sleeving
you were sleeving
he/she/it was sleeving
we were sleeving
you were sleeving
they were sleeving
Past Perfect
I had sleeved
you had sleeved
he/she/it had sleeved
we had sleeved
you had sleeved
they had sleeved
Future
I will sleeve
you will sleeve
he/she/it will sleeve
we will sleeve
you will sleeve
they will sleeve
Future Perfect
I will have sleeved
you will have sleeved
he/she/it will have sleeved
we will have sleeved
you will have sleeved
they will have sleeved
Future Continuous
I will be sleeving
you will be sleeving
he/she/it will be sleeving
we will be sleeving
you will be sleeving
they will be sleeving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sleeving
you have been sleeving
he/she/it has been sleeving
we have been sleeving
you have been sleeving
they have been sleeving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sleeving
you will have been sleeving
he/she/it will have been sleeving
we will have been sleeving
you will have been sleeving
they will have been sleeving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sleeving
you had been sleeving
he/she/it had been sleeving
we had been sleeving
you had been sleeving
they had been sleeving
Conditional
I would sleeve
you would sleeve
he/she/it would sleeve
we would sleeve
you would sleeve
they would sleeve
Past Conditional
I would have sleeved
you would have sleeved
he/she/it would have sleeved
we would have sleeved
you would have sleeved
they would have sleeved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sleeve - the part of a garment that is attached at the armhole and that provides a cloth covering for the armsleeve - the part of a garment that is attached at the armhole and that provides a cloth covering for the arm
cloth covering - a covering made of cloth
cuff, turnup - the lap consisting of a turned-back hem encircling the end of the sleeve or leg
dolman sleeve - a sleeve with a large armhole and tight cuff
elbow - the part of a sleeve that covers the elbow joint; "his coat had patches over the elbows"
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
long sleeve - a sleeve extending from shoulder to wrist
raglan sleeve - a sleeve that extends in one piece to the neckline of a coat or sweater with seams from the armhole to the neck
shirtsleeve - the sleeve of a shirt
short sleeve - a sleeve extending from the shoulder to the elbow
wristband - band consisting of a part of a sleeve that covers the wrist
2.sleeve - small case into which an object fits
case - a portable container for carrying several objects; "the musicians left their instrument cases backstage"
record cover, record sleeve - a sleeve for storing a phonograph record
Translations
غِلاف أسْطُوانَه فونوغرافِيَّهغِلاف الآلَهكُمكِمّ
rukávmanžetaobalobjímkapouzdro
ærmeomslagrør
hihakaulus
rukav
ruhaujjujjkarmantyúlemezborító
ermislíf, slithólkur, hulsa, múffaumslag
소매
berankovisįdėklasįmovarankovėsu... rankovėmis
apvāksievākojumspiedurkneuzmava
rukáv
rokav
ärm
แขนเสื้อ
elbise kolukol ağzıkol tertibatıplâk kabıyen
tay áo

sleeve

[sliːv]
A. N
1. [of garment] → manga f
to roll up one's sleevesarremangarse
to have sth up one's sleevetener algo en reserva
to laugh up one's sleevereírse para su capote
2. [of record] → funda f
3. (Mech) → manguito m, enchufe m
B. CPD sleeve notes NPL (Brit) (Mus) texto de la carátula de un disco

sleeve

[ˈsliːv] n
[shirt, coat] → manche f
He rolled his sleeves up → Il a remonté ses manches.
long sleeves → manches longues
short sleeves → manches courtes
to have sth up one's sleeve
She thought he had some clever trick up his sleeve → Elle pensait qu'il préparait un bon tour.
to wear one's heart on one's sleeve → montrer ses sentiments
(= cover) [record] → pochette f
the photograph of the conductor on the sleeve → la photo du chef d'orchestre sur la pochette

sleeve

n
(on garment) → Ärmel m; to roll up one’s sleeves (lit)sich (dat)die Ärmel hochkrempeln; (fig)die Ärmel aufkrempeln (inf); to have something up one’s sleeve (fig inf)etw in petto haben or auf Lager haben ? laugh
(for record, on book) → Hülle f
(Tech) → Muffe f, → Manschette f

sleeve

[sliːv] n (of garment) → manica; (of record) → copertina
to roll up one's sleeves → rimboccarsi le maniche
to have sth up one's sleeve (fig) → avere in serbo qc

sleeve

(sliːv) noun
1. the part of a garment that covers the arm. He tore the sleeve of his jacket; a dress with long/short sleeves.
2. (also ˈrecord-sleeve) a stiff envelope for a gramophone record.
3. something, eg a tubular part in a piece of machinery, that covers as a sleeve of a garment does the arm.
-sleeved
having (a certain kind of) sleeve(s). a long-sleeved dress.
ˈsleeveless adjective
without sleeves. a sleeveless dress.
have/keep (something) up one's sleeve
to keep (a plan etc) secret for possible use at a later time. I'm keeping this idea up my sleeve for the time being.

sleeve

كِمّ rukáv ærme Ärmel μανίκι manga hiha manche rukav manica 소매 mouw erme rękaw manga рукав ärm แขนเสื้อ kol ağzı tay áo 衣袖

sleeve

n. manga;
Put up your ___Súbase, súbete la manga.

sleeve

n manga; long-sleeve shirt..camisa de manga larga
References in classic literature ?
Yet I was hopeful, and though, as it turned out, he was busily engaged in talking to Thedosei Ivanovitch, I walked up to him from behind, and plucked at his sleeve.
Listen, Bilibin," said Helene (she always called friends of that sort by their surnames), and she touched his coat sleeve with her white, beringed fingers.
Alexander faced her, resting his arm on the mantel behind him, and began to brush the sleeve of his jacket.
Now give me the sleeve-- not that sleeve, the other one.
whispered Fan, affecting to examine a sleeve with care.
The ribbon was pulled out of Topsy's own sleeve, yet was she not in the least disconcerted; she only looked at it with an air of the most surprised and unconscious innocence.
The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a school-room, and the speaker's square forefinger emphasized his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the schoolmaster's sleeve.
Odsbodikins, it was but a dull lie, a most indifferent invention, but you should have seen them seize it and swallow it, in the frenzy of their fright, as it were sal- vation sent from heaven; and all the while was I laughing in my sleeve the one moment, to see them so cheaply deceived, and glorifying God the next, that He was content to let the meanest of His creatures be His instrument to the saving of thy life.
She had made them up herself, and they were all made alike--plain skirts fulled tightly to plain waists, with sleeves as plain as waist and skirt and tight as sleeves could be.
That poor man certainly deserves it; for, after all, isn't he in his shirt sleeves because he was good enough to buy a book for me?
She was a fresh, pretty woman, clad always in white with elbow sleeves.
Your career of mischief is at an end," said the Retraction, drawing his club, rolling up his sleeves, and spitting on his hands.