sleigh

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sleigh

a light vehicle on runners; a sled: a one-horse open sleigh
Not to be confused with:
slay – murder; slaughter; assassinate: They planned to slay the King.
sley – the reed of a loom; the warp count in woven fabrics
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

sleigh

 (slā)
n.
A vehicle mounted on runners for use on snow or ice, having one or more seats and usually drawn by a horse.
intr.v. sleighed, sleigh·ing, sleighs
To ride in or drive a sleigh.

[Dutch slee, variant of slede, from Middle Dutch.]

sleigh′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sleigh

(sleɪ)
n
(Automotive Engineering) another name for sledge11
vb
(Automotive Engineering) (intr) to travel by sleigh
[C18: from Dutch slee, variant of slede sledge1]
ˈsleigher n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sleigh

(sleɪ)

n.
1. a light vehicle on runners, usu. open and generally horse-drawn, used esp. for transporting persons over snow or ice.
2. a sled.
v.i.
3. to travel or ride in a sleigh.
[1690–1700, Amer.; < Dutch slee, variant of slede; see sled]
sleigh′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sleigh


Past participle: sleighed
Gerund: sleighing

Imperative
sleigh
sleigh
Present
I sleigh
you sleigh
he/she/it sleighs
we sleigh
you sleigh
they sleigh
Preterite
I sleighed
you sleighed
he/she/it sleighed
we sleighed
you sleighed
they sleighed
Present Continuous
I am sleighing
you are sleighing
he/she/it is sleighing
we are sleighing
you are sleighing
they are sleighing
Present Perfect
I have sleighed
you have sleighed
he/she/it has sleighed
we have sleighed
you have sleighed
they have sleighed
Past Continuous
I was sleighing
you were sleighing
he/she/it was sleighing
we were sleighing
you were sleighing
they were sleighing
Past Perfect
I had sleighed
you had sleighed
he/she/it had sleighed
we had sleighed
you had sleighed
they had sleighed
Future
I will sleigh
you will sleigh
he/she/it will sleigh
we will sleigh
you will sleigh
they will sleigh
Future Perfect
I will have sleighed
you will have sleighed
he/she/it will have sleighed
we will have sleighed
you will have sleighed
they will have sleighed
Future Continuous
I will be sleighing
you will be sleighing
he/she/it will be sleighing
we will be sleighing
you will be sleighing
they will be sleighing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sleighing
you have been sleighing
he/she/it has been sleighing
we have been sleighing
you have been sleighing
they have been sleighing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sleighing
you will have been sleighing
he/she/it will have been sleighing
we will have been sleighing
you will have been sleighing
they will have been sleighing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sleighing
you had been sleighing
he/she/it had been sleighing
we had been sleighing
you had been sleighing
they had been sleighing
Conditional
I would sleigh
you would sleigh
he/she/it would sleigh
we would sleigh
you would sleigh
they would sleigh
Past Conditional
I would have sleighed
you would have sleighed
he/she/it would have sleighed
we would have sleighed
you would have sleighed
they would have sleighed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sleigh - a vehicle mounted on runners and pulled by horses or dogssleigh - a vehicle mounted on runners and pulled by horses or dogs; for transportation over snow
bobsled, bobsleigh, bob - a long racing sled (for 2 or more people) with a steering mechanism
bobsled, bobsleigh - formerly two short sleds coupled together
dog sled, dog sleigh, dogsled - a sled pulled by dogs
luge - a racing sled for one or two people
pung - a one-horse sleigh consisting of a box on runners
runner - device consisting of the parts on which something can slide along
toboggan - a long narrow sled without runners; boards curve upward in front
vehicle - a conveyance that transports people or objects
Verb1.sleigh - ride (on) a sled
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
dogsled, mush - travel with a dogsled
bobsled, bob - ride a bobsled; "The boys bobbed down the hill screaming with pleasure"
luge, toboggan - move along on a luge or toboggan
ride - be carried or travel on or in a vehicle; "I ride to work in a bus"; "He rides the subway downtown every day"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مِزْلَجَه، زلاجَه
dopravní sáně
kane
kelkkareki
szán
sleîi
kamanas
sani
atlı kızak

sleigh

[sleɪ]
A. Ntrineo m
B. VI & VT = sledge 2
C. CPD sleigh bell Ncascabel m
sleigh ride N to go for a sleigh rideir a pasear en trineo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sleigh

[ˈsleɪ] ntraîneau m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sleigh

n(Pferde)schlitten m; sleigh bellSchlittenglocke f; sleigh rideSchlittenfahrt f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sleigh

[sleɪ] nslitta
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sleigh

(slei) noun
a usually large sledge pulled by a horse etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
She had never seen tin cooking-pots or wooden-shod sleighs before; but Kotuko the boy and Kotuko the dog were rather fond of her.
From a little distance you might have taken the lumps for seal or walrus, overturned sleighs or men on a hunting expedition, or even the great Ten-legged White Spirit-Bear himself; but in spite of these fantastic shapes, all on the very edge of starting into life, there was neither sound nor the least faint echo of sound.
Oh, these insufferable streets, shops, bakers' signboards, street lamps, and sleighs!" thought Rostov, when their leave permits had been passed at the town gate and they had entered Moscow.
Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
And with them were some curious sleighs, whose bodies were shaped like lions, swans, tigers, etc.--vehicles that had once been handsome with pictured designs and fine workmanship, but were dusty and decaying now.
As the young man walked toward it the upper windows drew a black arcade along the side wall of the building, but from the lower openings, on the side where the ground sloped steeply down to the Corbury road, the light shot its long bars, illuminating many fresh furrows in the track leading to the basement door, and showing, under an adjoining shed, a line of sleighs with heavily blanketed horses.
The next morning, when I looked out, I saw the hollow-backed bay between the Varnum spruces, and Ethan Frome, throwing back his worn bearskin, made room for me in the sleigh at his side.
Many of the American sleighs are elegant though the use of this mode of conveyance is much lessened with the melioration of the climate consequent to the clearing of the forests.
Simpson was absent from the home circle for the moment because he had exchanged the Widow Rideout's sleigh for Joseph Goodwin's plough.
As soon as the snow had packed hard, I began to drive about the country in a clumsy sleigh that Otto Fuchs made for me by fastening a wooden goods-box on bobs.
Before we start, I fix on the place where tea and a sleigh are to meet us, and we drive home again; because skating against the wind is as detestable as skating with it is delightful, and an unkind Nature arranges its blowing without the smallest regard for our convenience.
The sleigh-bells jingled to and fro continually: sometimes announcing the arrival of a sleigh from Vermont, laden with the frozen bodies of porkers, or sheep, and perhaps a deer or two; sometimes of a regular market-man, with chickens, geese, and turkeys, comprising the whole colony of a barn yard; and sometimes of a farmer and his dame, who had come to town partly for the ride, partly to go a-shopping, and partly for the sale of some eggs and butter.