slender

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slen·der

 (slĕn′dər)
adj. slen·der·er, slen·der·est
1.
a. Having little width in proportion to height or length; long and thin: a slender rod.
b. Thin and delicate in build; gracefully slim: "She was slender as a willow shoot is slender—and equally graceful, equally erect" (Frank Norris).
2. Small in amount or extent; meager: slender wages; a slender chance of survival.

[Middle English sclendre, slendre.]

slen′der·ly adv.
slen′der·ness n.

slender

(ˈslɛndə)
adj
1. of small width relative to length or height
2. (esp of a person's figure) slim and well-formed
3. small or inadequate in amount, size, etc: slender resources.
4. (of hopes, etc) having little foundation; feeble
5. very small: a slender margin.
6. (of a sound) lacking volume
7. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics (now only in Irish phonology) relating to or denoting a close front vowel, such as i or e
[C14 slendre, of unknown origin]
ˈslenderly adv
ˈslenderness n

slen•der

(ˈslɛn dər)

adj. -der•er, -der•est.
1. having a circumference that is small in proportion to the height or length: a slender post.
2. thin or slight; light and graceful: slender youths.
3. small in size, amount, extent, etc.; meager: a slender income.
4. having little value, force, or justification: slender prospects.
[1350–1400; Middle English s(c)lendre, of obscure orig.]
slen′der•ly, adv.
slen′der•ness, n.
syn: slender, slight, slim imply a tendency toward thinness. As applied to the human body, slender implies a generally attractive and pleasing thinness: slender hands. slight often adds the idea of frailness to that of thinness: a slight, almost fragile, figure. slim implies a lithe or delicate thinness: a slim and athletic figure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slender - being of delicate or slender build; "she was slender as a willow shoot is slender"- Frank Norris; "a slim girl with straight blonde hair"; "watched her slight figure cross the street"
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
2.slender - very narrow; "a thin line across the page"
narrow - not wide; "a narrow bridge"; "a narrow line across the page"
3.slender - having little width in proportion to the length or height; "a slender pole"
thin - of relatively small extent from one surface to the opposite or in cross section; "thin wire"; "a thin chiffon blouse"; "a thin book"; "a thin layer of paint"
4.slender - small in quantity; "slender wages"; "a slim chance of winning"; "a small surplus"
little, small - limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"
5.slender - moving and bending with ease
graceful - characterized by beauty of movement, style, form, or execution

slender

adjective
1. slim, narrow, slight, lean, svelte, willowy, sylphlike He gazed at her slender neck.
slim fat, stout, chubby, large, heavy, bulky, well-built, tubby, podgy
2. faint, slight, remote, slim, thin, weak, fragile, feeble, flimsy, tenuous the first slender hope of peace
faint good, strong, solid

slender

adjective
1. Having little flesh or fat on the body:
Idioms: all skin and bones, thin as a rail.
2. Small in degree, especially of probability:
Translations
رَفِيعضَعيف، ضَئيلمَمْشوق، نَحيف
štíhlýtenkýúzkýmizivý
slankspinkel
hoikka
tanak
grannurlítill
ほっそりした
날씬한
lieknas
niecīgsslaidstievs
mizivý
suhvitek
slank
ผอมเพรียว
mảnh mai

slender

[ˈslendəʳ] ADJ
1. [person] (= thin) → delgado, fino; (= slim and graceful) → esbelto; [waist, neck, hand] → delgado
2. (fig) [resources] → escaso; [hope etc] → lejano, remoto
by a slender majoritypor escasa mayoría

slender

[ˈslɛndər] adj
[person] → svelte, mince; [wrist, waist] → fin(e)
(= small) [chance, hope] → faible, ténu(e)

slender

adjschlank; hand, waist alsoschmal; resources, incomeknapp, mager; chance, hopeschwach, gering; excuse, profit margindürftig, schwach; lead, majorityknapp, gering

slender

[ˈslɛndəʳ] adj (person) → snello/a, slanciato/a; (waist, neck, hand) → sottile (fig) (resources, majority) → scarso/a, esiguo/a; (hope, chance) → piccolo/a, scarso/a

slender

(ˈslendə) adjective
1. thin, slim or narrow.
2. slight or small. His chances of winning are extremely slender.

slender

رَفِيع štíhlý slank schlank λιγνός esbelto hoikka svelte tanak snello ほっそりした 날씬한 slank slank szczupły esbelto стройный slank ผอมเพรียว tığ gibi mảnh mai 苗条的

slender

a. esbelto-a; delgado-a.
References in classic literature ?
However, maybe I will be as well off, for the nearer the hour approaches, the slenderer my chances for success appear.
Fourthly, a swallow, which though differing from the Progne purpurea of both Americas, only in being rather duller colored, smaller, and slenderer, is considered by Mr.
Powell, much slenderer than our robust friend is now, with the bloom of innocence not quite rubbed off his smooth cheeks, and apt not only to be interested but also to be surprised by the experience life was holding in store for him.
It emphasizes the new three-dimensional honeycomb pattern and broad flowing grille with dark chrome finish along with the slenderer lamp fitted with daytime running lights.
The new notched full HD+ panel has 19.5:9 aspect ratio, giving the device a slenderer look compared with its counterparts.
It assaulted the furniture, shattering the glass frogs I had collected in a display case behind the couch; threw framed photos into the air so they'd drop to the floor and crack (the sickening, deep sound of wood cracking; the shriller, slenderer sound of glass); the pottery I had made in classes at the community center, scattered across the laminate floor in pieces and shards, one of which pierced my bare foot a day later, drawing blood, for I had grown tired of cleaning up after it all the time.
They are humanoid in appearance, although much taller and slenderer than humans.
[8] reported that the freeze-thaw resistance of SFRLAC could be improved by the increase in the bond force between slenderer steel fibers with a large bond area and a high-strength matrix.
Cells subjected to both strain rates became longer, slenderer in shape, and oriented perpendicular to the axis of strain.
As can be seen from the curves, the cell is slenderer, the shrinkage ratio and bump ratio are smaller, and the canopy surface is smoother.