slews


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slew 1

also slue  (slo͞o)
n. Informal
A large amount or number; a lot: a slew of unpaid bills.

[Irish Gaelic sluagh, multitude, from Old Irish slúag.]

slew 2

 (slo͞o)
v.
A past tense of slay.

slew 3

 (slo͞o)
n.
Variant of slough1.

slew 4

also slue  (slo͞o)
v.tr. slewed, slew·ing, slews also slued or slu·ing or slues
1. To turn (something) on an axis; rotate: slewed the swivel chair around; slewing the boom of a crane.
2. To turn sharply; veer: braked and slewed the car around.
v.intr.
1. To turn about an axis: "The violet eyes slewed from door to window as if desperate for escape" (P.D. James).
2. To turn or slide sideways or off course; skid.
n.
The act of slewing.

[Origin unknown.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slews - a large number or amountslews - a large number or amount; "made lots of new friends"; "she amassed stacks of newspapers"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
References in classic literature ?
While I was battering away at the pyramid, a sort of badger-haired old merman, with a hump on his back, takes me by the shoulders, and slews me round.
When they had admitted him into the cote, they found that he made more havoc and slew a larger number of them in one day than the Kite could pounce upon in a whole year.
Wherefore he fled from what he deemed his father's house and in his flight he encountered and unwillingly slew his father Laius.
I and Umslopogaas slew Dingaan for the sake of Nada, who was my daughter.
And Nestor, knight of Gerene, answered, "Son of Atreus, I too would gladly be the man I was when I slew mighty Ereuthalion; but the gods will not give us everything at one and the same time.
From his fierce eyes there shone forth portentous fire: and once in high Calydon he slew the destroying beast, the fierce wild boar with gleaming tusks.
A sacristan commanded one party which captured several hundred prisoners in the course of a month; and there was Vasilisa, the wife of a village elder, who slew hundreds of the French.
And let no man doubt this Arkite story; for in the ancient Joppa, now Jaffa, on the Syrian coast, in one of the Pagan temples, there stood for many ages the vast skeleton of a whale, which the city's legends and all the inhabitants asserted to be the identical bones of the monster that Perseus slew. When the Romans took Joppa, the same skeleton was carried to Italy in triumph.