slipping


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Related to slipping: Slipping Away

slip 1

 (slĭp)
v. slipped, slip·ping, slips
v.intr.
1.
a. To move smoothly, easily, and quietly: slipped into bed.
b. To move stealthily; steal: slipped out the back door.
2.
a. To escape, as from a grasp, fastening, or restraint: slipped out of the wrestler's hold.
b. To put on or remove a piece of clothing smoothly or quietly: slipped into a nightgown; slipped out of the shirt.
3.
a. To slide involuntarily and lose one's balance or foothold. See Synonyms at slide.
b. To move accidentally out of place or fail to gain traction: The gear slipped.
4.
a. To pass gradually, easily, or imperceptibly into a different state: He slipped into a coma.
b. To decline from a former or standard level; fall off: The senator's popularity has slipped.
c. To elapse, especially quickly or without notice: The days slipped by.
5. To fall into fault or error. Often used with up.
v.tr.
1.
a. To place or insert smoothly and quietly: She slipped the letter into her pocket.
b. To insert (a remark, for example) unobtrusively: managed to slip his criticisms in before the end of the meeting.
2. To put on or remove (clothing) easily or quickly: slip on a sweater; slipped off her shoes.
3.
a. To get loose or free from; elude: slipped his pursuers.
b. To fail to be remembered by: Her name slips my memory.
4.
a. To release, loose, or unfasten: slip a knot.
b. To unleash or free (a dog or hawk) to pursue game.
5. To give birth to prematurely. Used of animals.
6. To dislocate (a bone).
7. To pass (a knitting stitch) from one needle to another without knitting it.
n.
1. The act or an instance of slipping or sliding.
2. An accident or mishap, especially resulting in a fall.
3.
a. An error in conduct or thinking; a mistake.
b. A slight error or oversight, as in speech or writing: a slip of the tongue.
4. Nautical
a. A docking place for a ship between two piers.
b. A slipway.
5. Nautical The difference between a vessel's actual speed through water and the speed at which the vessel would move if the screw were propelling against a solid.
6.
a. A woman's undergarment of dress length with shoulder straps.
b. A half-slip.
7. A pillowcase.
8. Geology
a. A smooth crack at which rock strata have moved on each other.
b. A small fault.
c. The relative displacement of formerly adjacent points on opposite sides of a fault.
9. The difference between optimal and actual output in a mechanical device.
10. Movement between two parts where none should exist, as between a pulley and a belt.
11. A sideways movement of an airplane when banked too far.
Phrasal Verb:
slip away
1. To depart without being noticed: We slipped away before the presentation was over.
2. To die gradually or peacefully.
3. To disappear or become unavailable: Don't let the opportunity slip away.
Idioms:
give (someone) the slip Slang
To escape the pursuit of.
let slip
To say inadvertently.
slip one over on Informal
To hoodwink; trick.

[Middle English slippen, probably of Middle Low German or Middle Dutch origin; see lei- in Indo-European roots.]

slip 2

 (slĭp)
n.
1. A part of a plant cut or broken off for grafting or planting; a scion or cutting.
2. A long narrow piece; a strip.
3. A slender youthful person: a slip of a child.
4. A small piece of paper, especially a small form, document, or receipt: a deposit slip.
5. A narrow pew in a church.
tr.v. slipped, slip·ping, slips
To make a slip from (a plant or plant part).

[Probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch slippe.]

slip 3

 (slĭp)
n.
Thinned potter's clay used for decorating or coating ceramics.

[Middle English, slime, from Old English slypa; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

SLIP

 (slĭp)
abbr.
Serial Line Internet Protocol
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slipping - moving as on a slippery surface; "his slipping and slithering progress over the ice"
slippery, slippy - causing or tending to cause things to slip or slide; "slippery sidewalks"; "a slippery bar of soap"; "the streets are still slippy from the rain"
Translations

slipping

n. el acto de resbalar.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this point, however, on the basis of the results presented above, it should be clear that [DELTA]T risings during oscillations correspond to the slipping parts of the stick-slip cycles.
An absorbent article having a liquid-permeable top sheet, a liquid-impermeable back sheet and an absorbent body between the top sheet and the back sheet, wherein the absorbent article comprises, at both sides in a lengthwise direction, a pair of flaps for anchoring the absorbent article to a clothing of a wearer, at least an excretory opening contact region of the top sheet and the pair of flaps have a blood slipping agent-containing first region and blood slipping agent-containing second regions each containing a blood slipping agent with a kinematic viscosity of 0.
Studies of an August 2009 slow slip event in Cascadia found that the tremor was concentrated in areas where the fault was slipping most rapidly.
Robert Bristow, 20, of Tremorfa, said he hit his nose on his bathroom wall after slipping in the tub about two weeks ago.