slipware


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slip·ware

 (slĭp′wâr′)
n.
Pottery coated or decorated with slip.

slipware

(ˈslɪpˌwɛə)
n
(Ceramics) pottery that has been decorated with slip

slip•ware

(ˈslɪpˌwɛər)

n.
pottery decorated with slip.
[1905–10]
References in periodicals archive ?
There were some exciting finds filmed that day, including a late 18th Century satinwood chest of drawers from the West Indies worth PS10,000, an architectural picture bought for a PS100 and valued at PS10,000, a slipware jug found on a rubbish tip worth at least PS6,000 and perhaps the oddest item of the day, a collection of glass eyes valued at an amazing PS20,000 to PS30,000.
The pair's work utilised elements of English pottery (including the use of materials and techniques such as earthenware, slipware and salt glaze) but in the style of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean pottery.
Jean-Nicholas Gerard of France uses traditional European slipware techniques to decorate everyday wares.
He was shocked when experts told him it was a rare, 17th-century Slipware cup, with an estimated price tag of pounds 50,000.
Ozzie turned out to be a rare slipware drinking cup.
THE Roadshow delighted a lady from Northampton when it revealed that Ozzie the Owl - which had graced her family's mantelpiece since her father was a boy - was a rare slipware drinking cup.
Haiyu Slipware encourages insight and depth as it is an ongoing process that involves the full engagement of the maker and asks one for another kind of engagement by the user of the work."
There were some exciting finds filmed that day, including a late 18th century satinwood chest of drawers from the West Indies worth PS10,000; an architectural picture bought for a PS100 and valued at PS10,000; a slipware jug found on a rubbish tip worth at least PS6,000; and perhaps the oddest item of the day, a collection of glass eyes valued at an amazing PS20,000 to PS30,000.
On a light-hearted but recently made contentious issue, British dairy farmers' dispute over forced price cuts were chronicled in Rebekah Locldey's slipware. The BA (Hons) Contemporary Craft graduate of University College Falmouth ceramics subverts 17th century themes of traditional English slipware
And when it is combined with the visual images of slipware, maiolica and brush-decorated stoneware et al, et al, it has no equal.