slothful


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sloth·ful

 (slôth′fəl, slōth′-, slŏth′-)
adj.
Disinclined to work or exertion; lazy. See Synonyms at lazy.

sloth′ful·ly adv.
sloth′ful·ness n.

slothful

(ˈsləʊθfʊl)
adj
indolent
ˈslothfully adv
ˈslothfulness n

sloth•ful

(ˈslɔθ fəl, ˈsloʊθ-)

adj.
indolent; lazy.
[1350–1400]
sloth′ful•ly, adv.
sloth′ful•ness, n.
syn: See idle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slothful - disinclined to work or exertion; "faineant kings under whose rule the country languished"; "an indolent hanger-on"; "too lazy to wash the dishes"; "shiftless idle youth"; "slothful employees"; "the unemployed are not necessarily work-shy"
idle - not in action or at work; "an idle laborer"; "idle drifters"; "the idle rich"; "an idle mind"

slothful

adjective (Formal) lazy, idle, inactive, indolent, do-nothing (informal), slack, sluggish, inert, skiving (Brit. slang), torpid, good-for-nothing, workshy, fainéant He was not slothful: he had been busy all night.

slothful

adjective
Resistant to exertion and activity:
Informal: do-nothing.
Idiom: bone lazy.
Translations

slothful

[ˈsləʊθfʊl] ADJperezoso, vago, flojo

slothful

[ˈsləʊθfʊl] adj (= idle) → paresseux/euseslot machine n
(for gambling)machine f à sous
(= vending machine) → distributeur m, distributeur m automatiqueslotted spoon nécumoire f

slothful

adjfaul; person, life alsoträge

slothful

[ˈsləʊθfʊl] adj (frm) → indolente
References in classic literature ?
No, Jane, no: this world is not the scene of fruition; do not attempt to make it so: nor of rest; do not turn slothful.
said the pious hermit; ``I tell thee, Sir Slothful Knight, that when I doff my friar's frock, my priesthood, my sanctity, my very Latin, are put off along with it; and when in my green jerkin, I can better kill twenty deer than confess one Christian.
Seeing which Don Quixote quitted the soft down, and, nowise slothful, dressed himself in his chamois suit and put on his travelling boots to hide the disaster to his stockings.
The bourgeoisie has disclosed how it came to pass that the brutal display of vigour in the Middle Ages, which Reactionists so much admire, found its fitting complement in the most slothful indolence.
There was plausible ground for each of these conjectures; but it must not be concealed that more than one elderly gentleman, the victim of good cheer and slothful habits, magisterially pronounced the secret of the whole matter to be Dyspepsia!
A civil war, indeed, is like the heat of a fever; but a foreign war is like the heat of exercise, and serveth to keep the body in health; for in a slothful peace, both courages will effeminate, and manners corrupt.
Philander; this is no time to indulge in slothful ease.
He reproached himself, made good resolutions, and prayed over this fault, but still he remained slothful and idle.
An unclean person is universally a slothful one, one who sits by a stove, whom the sun shines on prostrate, who reposes without being fatigued.
Napoleon as he was empirically known consisted of a series of gradually changing appearances: first a squalling baby, then a boy, then a slim and beautiful youth, then a fat and slothful person very magnificently dressed This series of appearances, and various occurrences having certain kinds of causal connections with them, constitute Napoleon as empirically known, and therefore are Napoleon in so far as he forms part of the experienced world.
I heard of the slothful Asiatics, of the stupendous genius and mental activity of the Grecians, of the wars and wonderful virtue of the early Romans--of their subsequent degenerating--of the decline of that mighty empire, of chivalry, Christianity, and kings.
The reader will readily anticipate that the savage had succeeded in gaining a dangerous proximity to one of those slothful sons of Ishmael, who were deputed to watch over the isolated encampment of the travellers.