sloughy


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slough 1

 (slo͞o, slou) also slew (slo͞o)
n.
1. A depression or hollow, usually filled with deep mud or mire.
2. also slue A swamp, marsh, bog, or pond, especially as part of a bayou, inlet, or backwater.
3. A state of deep despair or moral degradation.

[Middle English, from Old English slōh.]

slough′y adj.

slough 2

 (slŭf)
n.
1. The dead outer skin shed by a reptile or amphibian.
2. Medicine A layer or mass of dead tissue separated from surrounding living tissue, as in a wound, sore, or inflammation.
3. An outer layer or covering that is shed or removed.
v. sloughed, slough·ing, sloughs
v.intr.
1. To be cast off or shed; come off: "smooth fallen branches from which all bark has sloughed" (David M. Carroll).
2. To shed a slough: every time that a snake sloughs.
3. Medicine To separate from surrounding living tissue. Used of dead tissue.
v.tr.
1. To cast off or shed (skin or a covering): came inside and sloughed off his coat.
2. To discard or disregard as undesirable or unfavorable: sloughed off her misgivings.
Phrasal Verb:
slough off
Slang To work less intensely than is required or expected.

[Middle English slughe; akin to Middle High German slūch, sluoch , sloughed off snake skin (Modern German Schlauch, hose, tire tube).]

Slough

 (slou)
A borough of southeast England, a residential and industrial suburb of London.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sloughy - (of soil) soft and waterysloughy - (of soil) soft and watery; "the ground was boggy under foot"; "a marshy coastline"; "miry roads"; "wet mucky lowland"; "muddy barnyard"; "quaggy terrain"; "the sloughy edge of the pond"; "swampy bayous"
wet - covered or soaked with a liquid such as water; "a wet bathing suit"; "wet sidewalks"; "wet weather"
References in periodicals archive ?
He was found to have a completely destroyed glans, replaced with necrotic sloughy tissue.
Thrush does not produce fever, a red area on the breast or a sloughy nipple discharge.
The authors concluded that, although larval therapy is a more effective debriding agent than hydrogel, there is no evidence from this trial that it should be recommended for routine use on sloughy leg ulcers with the aim of speeding healing or reducing bacterial load.