slovenliness


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slov·en·ly

 (slŭv′ən-lē)
adj.
1. Untidy, as in dress or appearance.
2. Marked by negligence; careless or slipshod: a slovenly legal defense. See Synonyms at sloppy.

slov′en·li·ness n.
slov′en·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slovenliness - a lack of order and tidinessslovenliness - a lack of order and tidiness; not cared for
untidiness - the condition of being untidy
shagginess - unkemptness of hair
2.slovenliness - habitual uncleanliness
uncleanliness - lack of cleanly habits
slatternliness, sluttishness - in the manner of a slattern

slovenliness

noun
The state of being messy or unkempt:
Translations

slovenliness

[ˈslʌvnlɪnɪs] N [of appearance] → desaseo m; [of work] → chapucería f, descuido m

slovenliness

nSchlampigkeit f; (of person, work also)Schlud(e)rigkeit f (inf)

slovenliness

[ˈslʌvnlɪnɪs] n (of person) → sciatteria; (of work) → trascuratezza
References in classic literature ?
"Go not ungirt and loose, Sancho; for disordered attire is a sign of an unstable mind, unless indeed the slovenliness and slackness is to he set down to craft, as was the common opinion in the case of Julius Caesar.
It was annoying to come upon that everlasting slovenliness in the farm work against which he had been striving with all his might for so many years.
Sort of fruit not mentioned; their usual slovenliness in statistics.
Her voice became a little peremptory, and instinctively she suppressed inattention and corrected slovenliness. She knew what she was about and put Philip to scales and exercises.
Brooke's scrappy slovenliness. Dorothea said to herself that Mr.
The room itself is cobwebbed, and dingy with old paint; its floor is strewn with grey sand, in a fashion that has elsewhere fallen into long disuse; and it is easy to conclude, from the general slovenliness of the place, that this is a sanctuary into which womankind, with her tools of magic, the broom and mop, has very infrequent access.
Apollo was right to decry 'the shabbiness, slovenliness and general lack of an integrated approach to display' widely prevalent in museums 30 years ago.
It was true that the many and varied crimes of adolescence--from slovenliness to uncleanliness of thought and body--marked him.
He mailed the essay (along with a few poems) from the Charing Cross Post Office in 1887; from the letter he included, we know that the manuscript was "soiled," and for this he apologizes, saying that "it is due, not to slovenliness, but to the strange places and circumstances under which it has been written" (Letters of Francis Thompson 23).
Among the reasons for the incident, the head of state called criminal negligence and slovenliness.
Because of some criminal negligence, because of slovenliness. How could this ever happen?," he added.
His "slovenliness [was] so extreme, as to almost defy description." (98) Tall, angular, lean and sallow, Judge Woodward was a bachelor who "was extremely fond of the society of ladies." (99) He also enjoyed airing an astonishing vocabulary: "Words of six syllables suited his purpose much better than words of one syllable." (100) On the bench, he quarreled frequently with Judge Witherell, and was once characterized as a pedantic, "a wild theorist, fit only to extract sunbeams from cucumbers." (101) This view of Judge Woodward seems one-sided or only partially correct.

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