slovenly


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slov·en·ly

 (slŭv′ən-lē)
adj.
1. Untidy, as in dress or appearance.
2. Marked by negligence; careless or slipshod: a slovenly legal defense. See Synonyms at sloppy.

slov′en·li·ness n.
slov′en·ly adv.

slovenly

(ˈslʌvənlɪ)
adj
1. frequently or habitually unclean or untidy
2. negligent and careless; slipshod: slovenly manners.
adv
in a negligent or slovenly manner
ˈslovenliness n

slov•en•ly

(ˈslʌv ən li)

adj. -li•er, li•est,
adv. adj.
1. untidy or unclean in appearance or habits.
2. characteristic of a sloven; slipshod: slovenly work.
adv.
3. in an untidy, careless, or slipshod manner.
[1505–15]
slov′en•li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slovenly - negligent of neatness especially in dress and person; habitually dirty and unkempt; "filled the door with her frowzy bulk"; "frowzy white hair"; "slovenly appearance"
untidy - not neat and tidy; "careless and untidy in her personal habits"; "an untidy living room"; "untidy and casual about money"

slovenly

adjective
1. untidy, disorderly, unkempt, slatternly He was gruff, slovenly, and given to brooding.
untidy smart, trim, neat, tidy, orderly, clean, meticulous, well-groomed, shipshape, soigné or soignée
2. careless, sloppy (informal), negligent, slapdash, loose, slack, heedless, slipshod Such slovenly work is simply unacceptable.
careless careful, meticulous, conscientious, disciplined, methodical, well-ordered

slovenly

adjective
1. Marked by an absence of cleanliness and order:
2. Indifferent to correctness, accuracy, or neatness:
Translations

slovenly

[ˈslʌvnlɪ] ADJ [person] → descuidado; [appearance] → desaliñado, desaseado; [work] → chapucero, descuidado

slovenly

[ˈslʌvənli] adj (= untidy) [person] → négligé(e)

slovenly

adjschlud(e)rig (inf), → schlampig (inf); appearance, person alsoverlottert (inf)

slovenly

[ˈslʌvnlɪ] adj (person) → sciatto/a, trasandato/a; (work) → trascurato/a, poco accurato/a
References in classic literature ?
Dirty, ill-looking, scowling men; dirty, slovenly, and wickedly ugly women; children to match, snarling, filthy little curs, with a ready beggar's whine on occasion.
de Thou, and other slovenly executed people, that the headsman might inflict more than one stroke, that is to say, more than one martyrdom, on the poor tulip-fancier.
When we are not occupied in making machinery, we are (mentally speaking) the most slovenly people in the universe.
Besides, a slovenly way of driving gets a horse into bad and often lazy habits, and when he changes hands he has to be whipped out of them with more or less pain and trouble.
When the general is weak and without authority; when his orders are not clear and distinct; when there are no fixes duties assigned to officers and men, and the ranks are formed in a slovenly haphazard manner, the result is utter disorganization.
Upon my soul, if the London folk only knowed of thee and thy slovenly ways, they'd swaller their milk and butter more mincing than they do a'ready; and that's saying a good deal.
He is a dark- skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose.
Little, narrow streets; dirty children blockading them; greasy, slovenly women capturing and spanking them; filthy dens on first floors, with rag stores in them (the heaviest business in the Faubourg is the chiffonier's); other filthy dens where whole suits of second and third-hand clothing are sold at prices that would ruin any proprietor who did not steal his stock; still other filthy dens where they sold groceries--sold them by the half-pennyworth--five dollars would buy the man out, goodwill and all.
When driven with his mates to the new owners' camp, Buck saw a slipshod and slovenly affair, tent half stretched, dishes unwashed, everything in disorder; also, he saw a woman.
Yes, my friend," he added, with increasing grief, "it seems that I rhyme in a slovenly manner.
Harris said that if the best writer in the world once got the slovenly habit of doubling up his "haves" he could never get rid of it while he lived.
A clergyman has nothing to do but be slovenly and selfish--read the newspaper, watch the weather, and quarrel with his wife.

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