slows


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slow

 (slō)
adj. slow·er, slow·est
1.
a. Not moving or able to move quickly; proceeding at a low speed: a slow train; slow walkers.
b. Marked by a retarded tempo: a slow waltz.
2.
a. Taking or requiring a long time: the slow job of making bread.
b. Taking more time than is usual: a slow worker; slow progress in the peace negotiations.
3. Allowing movement or action only at a low speed: a slow track; a slow infield.
4. Registering a time or rate behind or below the correct one: a slow clock.
5. Lacking in promptness or willingness; not precipitate: They were slow to accept our invitation.
6. Characterized by a low volume of sales or transactions: Business was slow today.
7. Lacking liveliness or interest; boring: a slow party.
8. Not having or exhibiting intellectual or mental quickness: a slow learner.
9. Only moderately warm; low: a slow oven.
adv. slower, slowest
1. So as to fall behind the correct time or rate: The watch runs slow.
2. At a low speed: Go slow!
v. slowed, slow·ing, slows
v.tr.
1. To make slow or slower.
2. To delay; retard.
v.intr.
To become slow or slower.

[Middle English, from Old English slāw, obtuse, sluggish, dim-witted; akin to Dutch slee, blunt, dull, and Old Norse sljór, blunt, dim-witted.]

slow′ly adv.
slow′ness n.
Synonyms: slow, dilatory, leisurely, laggard
These adjectives mean taking more time than is usual or necessary. Slow is the least specific: a slow bus; a slow heartbeat; slow to anger. Dilatory implies lack of promptness caused by delay, procrastination, or indifference: paid a late fee because I was dilatory in paying the bill. Leisurely suggests a relaxed lack of haste: went for a leisurely walk by the river. Laggard implies hanging back or falling behind: "the horses' laggard pace" (Rudyard Kipling).
References in classic literature ?
A FLY sat on the axle-tree of a chariot, and addressing the Draught-Mule said, "How slow you are
As a measure of economy, however, I put some of the heavier baggage on the shoreward parts, to go as slow freight.
At the moment of speaking her hat had blown off into the road, their present speed on the upland being by no means slow.
Many of the old slow ways survived, the ways that were fast enough in the days of the stage-coach and the tinder-box.
But I hear only slow death preached, and patience with all that is "earthly.
This man he got merely to play simple airs in slow time, so that the assistants could keep the time and the air and pull the wires accordingly.
Brittles always was a slow boy, ma'am,' replied the attendant.
The fat, black horses went in a slow, measured trot, notwithstanding constant urging on the part of the fat, black coachman.
While in the devil devil houses the devil devil doctors set to work curing the many heads over slow smudges; for, along with the boat's crew there were a round dozen of No-ola return boys and several Malu boys which Van Horn had not yet delivered.
I took one slow step at a time and there warn't a sound, only I thought I could hear my heart.
Every movement was supple, slow, and apparently considered.
It was evidently a slow poison, and not too strong, that the bushmen used, for the wounded Poonga-Poonga man was still alive, and though his swollen shoulder was enormous, the inflammation had already begun to go down.