sluggard


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slug·gard

 (slŭg′ərd)
n.
A slothful person; an idler.
adj.
Lazy.

[Middle English sluggart, probably from sluggi, lazy, probably of Scandinavian origin.]

slug′gard·ly adj.

sluggard

(ˈslʌɡəd)
n
a person who is habitually indolent
adj
lazy
[C14 slogarde; related to slug1]
ˈsluggardly adj
ˈsluggardliness n
ˈsluggardness n

slug•gard

(ˈslʌg ərd)

n.
1. a person who is habitually inactive or lazy.
adj.
2. lazy; sluggardly.
[1350–1400; Middle English slogarde. See slug1, -ard]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sluggard - an idle slothful person
do-nothing, idler, layabout, loafer, bum - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"

sluggard

noun
A self-indulgent person who spends time avoiding work or other useful activity:
Slang: slouch.
adjective
Resistant to exertion and activity:
Informal: do-nothing.
Idiom: bone lazy.
Translations

sluggard

[ˈslʌgəd] Nharagán/ana m/f

sluggard

nFaulpelz m
References in classic literature ?
- GEORGE, THE SLUGGARD. - THE "WEATHER FORECAST" SWINDLE.
You remind me not to be a sluggard, Gashford, when the vineyard is menaced with destruction, and may be trodden down by Papist feet.
Kit was no sluggard next morning, but, springing from his bed some time before day, began to prepare for his welcome expedition.
Then he said aloud, "Here I grow fat like a stall-fed ox and all my manliness departeth from me while I become a sluggard and dolt.
This disposes of the last remnant of his reputation and wholly destroys his main usefulness as a moral agent, since it will make the sluggard hesitate to go to him any more.
"I proved myself a sluggard on my post during the past night," said Heyward, "and have less need of repose than you, who did more credit to the character of a soldier.
And so, wearily and little by little, but surely and steadily on the whole, was brought home to the young boy, for the first time, the meaning of his life--that it was no fool's or sluggard's paradise into which he had wandered by chance, but a battlefield ordained from of old, where there are no spectators, but the youngest must take his side, and the stakes are life and death.
And yet, in spite of the killing pace and the stony track, who but the sluggard or the dolt can hold aloof from the course?
At this the marksman seized his gun, took aim, and fired in the direction of the world's end, in order to awaken the sluggard. And a moment later the swift runner reappeared, and, stepping on board the ship, handed the healing water to the Simpleton.
Answer: A sluggard; how very pleasant it would have been to hear that of oneself!
His master one day, pretending to be angry and shaking his stick at him, said, "You wretched little sluggard! what shall I do to you?
Verily, in broad daylight did he fall asleep, the sluggard! Had he perhaps chased butterflies too much?