smock

(redirected from smock-frocks)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

smock

 (smŏk)
n.
A loose coatlike outer garment, often worn to protect the clothes while working.
tr.v. smocked, smock·ing, smocks
1. To clothe in a smock.
2. To decorate (fabric) with smocking.

[Middle English, woman's undergarment, from Old English smoc.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

smock

(smɒk)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) any loose protective garment, worn by artists, laboratory technicians, etc
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a woman's loose blouse-like garment, reaching to below the waist, worn over slacks, etc
3. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: smock frock a loose protective overgarment decorated with smocking, worn formerly esp by farm workers
4. (Clothing & Fashion) archaic a woman's loose undergarment, worn from the 16th to the 18th centuries
vb
(Knitting & Sewing) to ornament (a garment) with smocking
[Old English smocc; related to Old High German smocco, Old Norse smokkr blouse, Middle High German gesmuc decoration]
ˈsmockˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

smock

(smɒk)

n.
1. a loose, lightweight overgarment worn to protect the clothing while working.
v.t.
2. to clothe in a smock.
3. to draw (a fabric) by needlework into a honeycomb pattern with diamond-shaped recesses.
[before 1000; Middle English (n.), Old English smocc orig. a garment with a hole for the head]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

smock


Past participle: smocked
Gerund: smocking

Imperative
smock
smock
Present
I smock
you smock
he/she/it smocks
we smock
you smock
they smock
Preterite
I smocked
you smocked
he/she/it smocked
we smocked
you smocked
they smocked
Present Continuous
I am smocking
you are smocking
he/she/it is smocking
we are smocking
you are smocking
they are smocking
Present Perfect
I have smocked
you have smocked
he/she/it has smocked
we have smocked
you have smocked
they have smocked
Past Continuous
I was smocking
you were smocking
he/she/it was smocking
we were smocking
you were smocking
they were smocking
Past Perfect
I had smocked
you had smocked
he/she/it had smocked
we had smocked
you had smocked
they had smocked
Future
I will smock
you will smock
he/she/it will smock
we will smock
you will smock
they will smock
Future Perfect
I will have smocked
you will have smocked
he/she/it will have smocked
we will have smocked
you will have smocked
they will have smocked
Future Continuous
I will be smocking
you will be smocking
he/she/it will be smocking
we will be smocking
you will be smocking
they will be smocking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been smocking
you have been smocking
he/she/it has been smocking
we have been smocking
you have been smocking
they have been smocking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been smocking
you will have been smocking
he/she/it will have been smocking
we will have been smocking
you will have been smocking
they will have been smocking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been smocking
you had been smocking
he/she/it had been smocking
we had been smocking
you had been smocking
they had been smocking
Conditional
I would smock
you would smock
he/she/it would smock
we would smock
you would smock
they would smock
Past Conditional
I would have smocked
you would have smocked
he/she/it would have smocked
we would have smocked
you would have smocked
they would have smocked
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smock - a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the anklessmock - a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the ankles
coverall - a loose-fitting protective garment that is worn over other clothing
Verb1.smock - embellish by sewing in straight lines crossing each other diagonally; "The folk dancers wore smocked shirts"
adorn, decorate, grace, ornament, embellish, beautify - make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مَريول، ثَوْب واسِع فَضْفاض
halena
busseronne
mussa
palaidinis
uzsvārcis
halena
delovna halja
iş gömleği

smock

[smɒk]
A. N (for artist) → bata f, guardapolvo m; (for expectant mother) → bata f corta, tontón m
B. VTfruncir, adornar con frunces
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

smock

[ˈsmɒk] n
(= loose blouse) → tunique f ample
(= protective garment) → sarrau m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

smock

nKittel m; (as top) → Hänger m
vtsmoken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

smock

[smɒk] n (loose shirt) → camiciotto; (blouse) → blusa; (to protect clothing) → grembiule m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

smock

(smok) noun
a loose, shirt-like garment.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The kitchen was an old, low-roofed room; with a great beam across the middle of the ceiling, and benches, with high backs to them, by the fire; on which were seated several rough men in smock-frocks, drinking and smoking.
Suddenly a noise roused his attention, and on the far side of a field on his left hand he could see six or seven men in smock-frocks with hay-forks in their hands making an offensive approach towards the four railway agents who were facing them, while Caleb Garth and his assistant were hastening across the field to join the threatened group.
Men who had lounged about all night in smock-frocks and leather leggings, came out in silken vests and hats and plumes, as jugglers or mountebanks; or in gorgeous liveries as soft-spoken servants at gambling booths; or in sturdy yeoman dress as decoys at unlawful games.
The watch-maker, always poring over a little desk with a magnifying glass at his eye, and always inspected by a group of smock-frocks poring over him through the glass of his shop-window, seemed to be about the only person in the High-street whose trade engaged his attention.
The pipes began to be puffed in a silence which had an air of severity; the more important customers, who drank spirits and sat nearest the fire, staring at each other as if a bet were depending on the first man who winked; while the beer-drinkers, chiefly men in fustian jackets and smock-frocks, kept their eyelids down and rubbed their hands across their mouths, as if their draughts of beer were a funereal duty attended with embarrassing sadness.