smoked


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smoke

 (smōk)
n.
1.
a. A mixture of gases and small suspended particles of soot or other solids, resulting from the burning of materials such as wood or coal.
b. A cloud of such gases and suspended particles.
c. A vapor, mist, or fume that resembles this.
2. Something insubstantial, unreal, or transitory: "What everybody echoes or in silence passes by as true to-day may turn out to be falsehood to-morrow, mere smoke of opinion" (Henry David Thoreau).
3.
a. The act of smoking a form of tobacco: went out for a smoke.
b. The duration of this act.
4. Informal Tobacco in a form that can be smoked, especially a cigarette: money to buy smokes.
5. A substance used in warfare to produce a smokescreen.
6. Something used to conceal or obscure.
7. A pale to grayish blue to bluish or dark gray.
8. Baseball Pitches thrown at high velocity; fast balls: threw a lot of smoke in the early innings.
v. smoked, smok·ing, smokes
v.intr.
1.
a. To draw in and exhale smoke from a cigarette, cigar, or pipe: It's forbidden to smoke here.
b. To engage in smoking regularly or habitually: He smoked for years before stopping.
2. To emit smoke or a smokelike substance: chimneys smoking in the cold air.
3. To emit smoke excessively: The station wagon smoked even after the tune-up.
4. Slang
a. To go or proceed at high speed.
b. To play or perform energetically: The band was really smoking in the second set.
v.tr.
1.
a. To draw in and exhale the smoke of (tobacco, for example): I've never smoked a panatela.
b. To do so regularly or habitually: I used to smoke filtered cigarettes.
2. To preserve (meat or fish) by exposure to the aromatic smoke of burning hardwood, usually after pickling in salt or brine.
3.
a. To fumigate (a house, for example).
b. To expose (animals, especially insects) to smoke in order to immobilize or drive away.
4. To expose (glass) to smoke in order to darken or change its color.
5. Slang
a. To kill; murder.
b. To defeat decisively, as in a competition.
6. Baseball To throw (a pitch) at high velocity.
Phrasal Verb:
smoke out
1. To force out of a place of hiding or concealment by or as if by the use of smoke.
2. To detect and bring to public view; expose or reveal: smoke out a scandal.
Idioms:
go up in smoke
1. To be destroyed by fire.
2. To experience complete failure in an attempt to do or achieve something: Our plans to open a bakery went up in smoke when we were unable to secure funding.
smoke and mirrors
Something that deceives or distorts the truth: Your explanation is nothing but smoke and mirrors.

[Middle English, from Old English smoca.]

smok′a·ble, smoke′a·ble adj.

smoked

(sməʊkt)
adj
1. (Cookery) cookery (of meat, fish, cheese, etc) cured by treating with smoke
2. (Ceramics) darkened or tinted by exposure to smoke
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.smoked - (used especially of meats and fish) dried and cured by hanging in wood smoke
preserved - prevented from decaying or spoiling and prepared for future use
Translations
مُدَخَّنمُلَوَّن
uzený
røget
savustettusavu
zatamnjen
füstölt
reyktur
いぶした
훈제한
údený
prekajen
rökt
รมควัน
вуджений
hun khói

smoked

[sməʊkt] ADJ [bacon, fish, cheese] → ahumado
smoked glasscristal m or (LAm) vidrio m ahumado

smoked

[ˈsməʊkt] adj [bacon, glass] → fumé(e)smoked haddock nhaddock msmoked salmon nsaumon m fumésmoke-filled [ˈsməʊkfɪld] adjenfumé(e)smoke-free [ˌsməʊkˈfriː] adj [area, environment, workplace] → non-fumeurs invsmoke inhalation ninhalation f de fuméesmokeless fuel [ˈsməʊkləs] ncombustible m non fumigènesmokeless zone [ˈsməʊkləs] n (British) zone où l'usage du charbon est réglementé

smoked

adj bacon, fishgeräuchert, Räucher-

smoked

:
smoked glass
mRauchglas nt
smoked glasses
plGläser plaus Rauchglas
smoked salmon

smoked

[sməʊkt] adj (bacon, fish,) → affumicato/a
smoked glass → vetro fumé

smoke

(sməuk) noun
1. the cloudlike gases and particles of soot given off by something which is burning. Smoke was coming out of the chimney; He puffed cigarette smoke into my face.
2. an act of smoking (a cigarette etc). I came outside for a smoke.
verb
1. to give off smoke.
2. to draw in and puff out the smoke from (a cigarette etc). I don't smoke, but he smokes cigars.
3. to dry, cure, preserve (ham, fish etc) by hanging it in smoke.
smoked adjective
treated with smoke. smoked cheese.
ˈsmokeless adjective
1. allowing no smoke. Our part of the town is a smokeless zone.
2. burning without smoke. smokeless fuel.
ˈsmoker noun
a person who smokes cigarettes etc. When did you become a smoker?; He's a pipe-smoker.
ˈsmoking noun
the habit of smoking cigarettes etc. He has given up cigarette-smoking at last; Smoking can damage your health.
ˈsmoky adjective
1. filled with, or giving out (too much) smoke. The atmosphere in the room was thick and smoky.
2. like smoke in appearance etc.

ˈsmokiness

noun
smoke detector
a device in a building which sounds a fire alarm when smoke passes through it.
ˈsmokescreen noun
1. a cloud of smoke used to conceal the movements of troops etc.
2. something intended to conceal one's activities etc.
go up in smoke
1. to be completely destroyed by fire. The whole house went up in smoke.
2. to vanish very quickly leaving nothing behind. All his plans have gone up in smoke.

smoked

مُلَوَّن uzený røget geräuchert καπνιστός ahumado savustettu fumé zatamnjen affumicato いぶした 훈제한 gerookt røykt wędzony defumado, fumado дымчатый rökt รมควัน tütsülenmiş hun khói 烟熏的
References in classic literature ?
lighting the pipe at the binnacle lamp and planting the stool on the weather side of the deck, he sat and smoked.
James Harthouse smiled; and rising from his end of the sofa, and lounging with his back against the chimney-piece, so that he stood before the empty fire-grate as he smoked, in front of Tom and looking down at him, observed:
He smoked with great gravity and dignity for a little while, and then added, in a highly complacent tone, 'Oh
James Harthouse, throwing away the last small remnant of the cigar he had now smoked out.
Luckily the boy was case-hardened, and would have smoked a small lime-kiln if anybody had treated him with it.
Mr Brass applauding this picture very much, and the bed being soft and comfortable, Mr Quilp determined to use it, both as a sleeping place by night and as a kind of Divan by day; and in order that it might be converted to the latter purpose at once, remained where he was, and smoked his pipe out.
Then it was as if an invisible yet intensely heated finger were drawn through the heather between me and the Martians, and all along a curving line beyond the sand pits the dark ground smoked and crackled.
Patches of bush and isolated trees here and there smoked and glowed still, and the houses towards Woking station were sending up spires of flame into the stillness of the evening air.
He smoked two cigars; then he went inside and drank another glass of wine.
I have kids, and I never smoked in my house; I smoked in my backyard.
They may be smoked, drunk in teas, used as capsules of tinctures, or even chewed Another part of quitting is to analyze relapse triggers and figure out how to avoid them, so you may want to choose not to smoke your herbs if you feel this practice will perpetuate your habit.