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Related to smoky: smoky quartz


adj. smok·i·er, smok·i·est
1. Emitting smoke in profuse volume: a smoky stove.
2. Mixed or filled with smoke: smoky corridors.
3. Resembling smoke: a smoky haze.
4. Discolored or soiled with or as if with smoke: "The smoky Sicilian afternoon sun tinged the green landscape with red" (Mario Puzo).
5. Tasting of smoke: smoky sausages.

smok′i·ly adv.
smok′i·ness n.


(ˈsməʊkɪ) or


adj, smokier or smokiest
1. emitting, containing, or resembling smoke
2. emitting smoke excessively or in the wrong place: a smoky fireplace.
3. (Colours) of or tinged with the colour smoke: a smoky cat.
4. (Cookery) having the flavour of having been cured by smoking
5. made dark, dirty, or hazy by smoke
ˈsmokily adv
ˈsmokiness n


(ˈsmoʊ ki)

adj. smok•i•er, smok•i•est.
1. emitting smoke, esp. in large amounts.
2. hazy; darkened or begrimed with smoke.
3. having the character or appearance of smoke: smoky colors.
4. pertaining to or suggestive of smoke: a smoky haze.
5. of a dull or brownish gray.
smok′i•ly, adv.
smok′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.smoky - marked by or emitting or filled with smoke; "smoky rafters"; "smoky chimneys"; "a smoky fireplace"; "a smoky corridor"
smokeless - emitting or containing little or no smoke; "smokeless factory stacks"; "smokeless fuel"; "a smokeless environment"
2.smoky - tasting of smoke; "smoky sausages"
tasty - pleasing to the sense of taste; "a tasty morsel"


1. thick, murky, hazy, reeky the extremely smoky atmosphere at work
2. grey, dark grey, slate-grey, dark He had smoky grey-blue eyes.
شبيه بالدُّخانمليء بالدُّخان
reykkenndurreykmettur, sem mikiî rÿkur úr
duman gibidumanlı


[ˈsməʊkɪ] ADJ (smokier (compar) (smokiest (superl))) [chimney, fire] → humeante, que humea; [room, atmosphere] → lleno de humo; [flavour, surface etc] → ahumado
it's smoky in hereaquí hay mucho humo


[ˈsməʊki] adjenfumé(e)


adj (+er) chimney, firerauchend; room, atmosphereverraucht; (= stained by smoke)verräuchert; (= like smoke) flavourrauchig; colourrauchfarben; smoky glassRauchglas nt


smoky bacon
smoky blue
smoky grey, (US) smoky gray


[ˈsməʊkɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (chimney, fire) → fumoso/a, che fa fumo; (room, atmosphere) → fumoso/a, pieno/a di fumo; (flavour) → affumicato/a


(sməuk) noun
1. the cloudlike gases and particles of soot given off by something which is burning. Smoke was coming out of the chimney; He puffed cigarette smoke into my face.
2. an act of smoking (a cigarette etc). I came outside for a smoke.
1. to give off smoke.
2. to draw in and puff out the smoke from (a cigarette etc). I don't smoke, but he smokes cigars.
3. to dry, cure, preserve (ham, fish etc) by hanging it in smoke.
smoked adjective
treated with smoke. smoked cheese.
ˈsmokeless adjective
1. allowing no smoke. Our part of the town is a smokeless zone.
2. burning without smoke. smokeless fuel.
ˈsmoker noun
a person who smokes cigarettes etc. When did you become a smoker?; He's a pipe-smoker.
ˈsmoking noun
the habit of smoking cigarettes etc. He has given up cigarette-smoking at last; Smoking can damage your health.
ˈsmoky adjective
1. filled with, or giving out (too much) smoke. The atmosphere in the room was thick and smoky.
2. like smoke in appearance etc.


smoke detector
a device in a building which sounds a fire alarm when smoke passes through it.
ˈsmokescreen noun
1. a cloud of smoke used to conceal the movements of troops etc.
2. something intended to conceal one's activities etc.
go up in smoke
1. to be completely destroyed by fire. The whole house went up in smoke.
2. to vanish very quickly leaving nothing behind. All his plans have gone up in smoke.
References in classic literature ?
In the late afternoon in the hot summers when the road and the fields are covered with dust, a smoky haze lies over the great flat basin of land.
When the smoky clouds hung low in the west and the red sun went down behind them, leaving a pink flush on the snowy roofs and the blue drifts, then the wind sprang up afresh, with a kind of bitter song, as if it said: `This is reality, whether you like it or not.
But presently I came to a smoky light proceeding from a low, wide building, the door of which stood invitingly open.
But more I marvelled that the priests should swear that smoky jet of his was genuine.
Hour after hour this had continued--the darkness had fallen and the room was dim from the light of two smoky oil lamps.
Next a smoky fog of clouds covered the whole region densely, and we took to the railway-ties to keep from getting lost.
The whooping went on, and in about a minute I come a-booming down on a cut bank with smoky ghosts of big trees on it, and the current throwed me off to the left and shot by, amongst a lot of snags that fairly roared, the currrent was tearing by them so swift.
But anyway, he gets out by himself and mopes and thinks; and mostly he hunts for a lonesome place high up on the hill in the edge of the woods, and sets there and looks away off on the big Mississippi down there a-reaching miles and miles around the points where the timber looks smoky and dim it's so far off and still, and everything's so solemn it seems like everybody you've loved is dead and gone, and you 'most wish you was dead and gone too, and done with it all.
Slightly observant of the smoky lights; of the people, pipe in mouth, playing with limp cards and yellow dominoes; of the one bare- breasted, bare-armed, soot-begrimed workman reading a journal aloud, and of the others listening to him; of the weapons worn, or laid aside to be resumed; of the two or three customers fallen forward asleep, who in the popular high-shouldered shaggy black spencer looked, in that attitude, like slumbering bears or dogs; the two outlandish customers approached the counter, and showed what they wanted.
The old man raked the fire together with an old stair-rod, and having trimmed his smoky lamp (for it was night), with the stem of his pipe, put it in his mouth again.
She looked so quiet and good, and reminded me so strongly of my airy fresh school days at Canterbury, and the sodden, smoky, stupid wretch I had been the other night, that, nobody being by, I yielded to my self-reproach and shame, and - in short, made a fool of myself.
I knew nothing until I knew that we were on the floor by the great table, and that patches of tinder yet alight were floating in the smoky air, which, a moment ago, had been her faded bridal dress.