smoor

smoor

(smʊə)
vb (tr)
Scot to smother, suffocate or extinguish
References in periodicals archive ?
521/1127) explains in his commentary (as translated by Pieter Smoor):
Smoor), Encyclopaedia of Islam, New Edition (Leiden: Brill, 1960-2004), hereafter E12.
Summary: Karnataka [India], May 07 (NewsVoir): California Walnut Commission in association with Smoor hosted its first ever California Walnut Festival in Bengaluru today.
Kanchan Achpal, Head of Marketing, Smoor added, "Walnuts offer great taste and texture that holds up to a variety of flavour pairings.
She and fellow members of Stock-Stock smoor Village charity Ladies group raised around PS700 by hosting a luncheon at the weekend.
But it also lists smoor, meaning precisely the same as the headword here.
With regard to a possible Dutch origin, Murison comments that smoor, 'to suffocate', 'is first recorded in Scots about 1470, but if it is to be connected with Middle Dutch smoren, [it] must have been in the language much earlier, to make the phonology explicable' (1971: 172).
I'll smoor some of them.' He identifies himself with lightning in his second speech (I.2.5) and Cornelia places a garland on dead Marcello's head to protect him from 'lightning' (V.4.70).
Pieter Smoor. Centennial Hauntings: Pope, Byron and Eliot in the Year 88.
Former Shelley High School pupil Kerstin and her husband Stephen Botham raised PS1,900 for Action Postpartum Psychosis at a purple party at the Clothiers Arms in Stock-Stock smoor.
Resullts from recent meetings of Stock smoor Bridge Club were: October 30, 20 players - 25 boards played.