smuggery

smuggery

(ˈsmʌɡərɪ)
n
the condition or an instance of being smug; smugness
References in periodicals archive ?
But Helmet Hair's self-serving smuggery just added "entering into an covenant with the devil of Thomas Cook's" to the list of charges.
My Leeds-living friend Prong (or 'exfriend Prong', now I've used his least favourite nickname in print) took pause from an exceptionally satisfying crispy shredded beef to summon up every ounce of middle class smuggery; he proudly exclaimed "Why do you need to use public transport anyway?
On its day, I bet there's enough talent in your agency to do as good a job as any "first-tier" agency; and without the smuggery. So why not go for it; do it extremely well; win it; and let confi-dence seep back into your agency likeabloodtransfusion.Evenifthe account turns out to be transient, the consequences needn't be.
I could also do with less smuggery from the BBC, Scotland's metereological maids.
Will this be the same without Piers Morgan's self-regard, Simon Cowell's smuggery and Amanda Holden's think-of-the-children blubbering?
Lesson learned: mourners don't have to be eloquent and a simple, "I'm sorry," can say much more than a galling bit of smuggery like, "Your father's gone to a better place."
He has dedicated a bedroom to his collection, which runs into thousands - he calls it his "smuggery".