smuggler


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

smug·gle

 (smŭg′əl)
v. smug·gled, smug·gling, smug·gles
v.tr.
1.
a. To bring into a country (a prohibited item) secretively and intentionally, in violation of the law.
b. To bring into a country (an item) secretively and intentionally without declaring the item to customs officials and paying the associated duties or taxes on it, in violation of the law.
2. To bring in or take out illicitly or by stealth: smuggled homemade popcorn into the theater.
v.intr.
To engage in smuggling.

[Probably Low German smukkeln, smuggeln or Middle Dutch smokkelen.]

smug′gler n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smuggler - someone who imports or exports without paying dutiessmuggler - someone who imports or exports without paying duties
coyote - someone who smuggles illegal immigrants into the United States (usually across the Mexican border)
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
arms-runner, gunrunner - a smuggler of guns
rumrunner - someone who illegally smuggles liquor across a border

smuggler

smuggler

noun
A person who engages in smuggling:
Translations
pašerák
smugler
salakuljettaja
krijumčar
csempész
smyglari
密輸業者
밀수업자
pašerák
tihotapec
smugglare
ผู้ลักลอบนำเข้า
người buôn lậu

smuggler

[ˈsmʌgləʳ] Ncontrabandista mf

smuggler

[ˈsmʌgər] ncontrebandier/ière m/f

smuggler

nSchmuggler(in) m(f)

smuggler

[ˈsmʌgləʳ] ncontrabbandiere/a

smuggle

(ˈsmagl) verb
1. to bring (goods) into, or send them out from, a country illegally, or without paying duty. He was caught smuggling (several thousand cigarettes through the Customs).
2. to send or take secretly. I smuggled some food out of the kitchen.
ˈsmuggler noun
a person who smuggles.
ˈsmuggling noun
the laws against smuggling; drug-smuggling.

smuggler

مُهَرِّبُ بَضَائِعَ pašerák smugler Schmuggler λαθρέμπορος contrabandista salakuljettaja contrebandier krijumčar contrabbandiere 密輸業者 밀수업자 smokkelaar smugler przemytnik contrabandista контрабандист smugglare ผู้ลักลอบนำเข้า kaçakçı người buôn lậu 走私犯
References in classic literature ?
Would I take Scotty, the runaway sailor, to visit the harpooner, on the opium- smuggler Idler?
The smuggler raised his head and looked at Genestas by way of acknowledging the compliment.
He had been a desperate smuggler in his younger days.
A certain portion of his time was passed at Cambridge, where he read with undergraduates as a sort of tolerated smuggler who drove a contraband trade in European languages, instead of conveying Greek and Latin through the Custom-house.
We have no foolish ideas about wealth, but comfort is another matter, and our daughter should at least marry a man who can give her that - and not a penniless adventurer, a sailor, a cowboy, a smuggler, and Heaven knows what else, who, in addition to everything, is hare- brained and irresponsible.
Itself a close and confined prison for debtors, it contained within it a much closer and more confined jail for smugglers.
From one activity to another had Tom Swift gone, now constructing some important invention for himself, as among others, when he made the photo-telephone, or developed a great searchlight which he presented to the Government for use in detecting smugglers on the border.
Some of the men who had been to field-work on the far side of the Admiral Benbow remembered, besides, to have seen several strangers on the road, and taking them to be smugglers, to have bolted away; and one at least had seen a little lugger in what we called Kitt's Hole.
under pretext of trading along the coast, these men, who are in reality smugglers, will prefer selling me to doing a good action.
They are, perhaps, in truth, a little disposed to be smugglers, but what harm is in that?
We Rattrays have always been a pretty warm lot, Cole, and in the old days we were the most festive smugglers on the coast; this tunnel's a relic of 'em, although it was only a tradition till I came into the property.
Flat, offering nothing but a tiny bay for the convenience of embarkation, and under the protection of the governor, who went shares with them, smugglers made use of it as a provisional