snakeroot


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Related to snakeroot: white snakeroot, Indian snakeroot

snake·root

 (snāk′ro͞ot′, -ro͝ot′)
n.
Any of various plants, such as black cohosh, rattlesnake master, sanicle, or wild ginger, having roots reputed to cure snakebite.

snakeroot

(ˈsneɪkˌruːt)
n
1. (Plants) any of various North American plants, such as Aristolochia serpentaria (Virginia snakeroot) and Eupatorium urticaefolium (white snakeroot), the roots or rhizomes of which have been used as a remedy for snakebite
2. (Plants) the rhizome or root of any such plant
3. (Plants) another name for bistort1, bistort2
Also called: snakeweed

snake•root

(ˈsneɪkˌrut, -ˌrʊt)

n.
1. any of various plants whose roots have been regarded as a remedy for snakebites.
2. the root or rhizome of such a plant.
[1625–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snakeroot - a plant of the genus Sanicula having palmately compound leaves and unisexual flowers in panicled umbels followed by bristly fruitsnakeroot - a plant of the genus Sanicula having palmately compound leaves and unisexual flowers in panicled umbels followed by bristly fruit; reputed to have healing powers
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Sanicula, Sanicula - chiefly American herbs: sanicle
footsteps-of-spring, Sanicula arctopoides - sanicle of northwestern United States and British Columbia having yellow flowers
purple sanicle, Sanicula bipinnatifida - sanicle of northwestern United States and British Columbia having yellow or red or purple flowers
European sanicle, Sanicula Europaea - sanicle of Europe and Asia having white to pale pink flowers
2.snakeroot - any of various North American plants of the genus Liatris having racemes or panicles of small discoid flower headssnakeroot - any of various North American plants of the genus Liatris having racemes or panicles of small discoid flower heads
wild flower, wildflower - wild or uncultivated flowering plant
genus Liatris, Liatris - genus of perennial North American herbs with aromatic usually cormous roots
dotted gayfeather, Liatris punctata - herb with many stems bearing narrow slender wands of crowded rose-lavender flowers; central United States and Canada to Texas and northern Mexico
dense blazing star, Liatris pycnostachya - perennial of southeastern and central United States having very dense spikes of purple flowers; often cultivated for cut flowers
References in periodicals archive ?
(Polygalaceae), known as "raiz-de-cobra" (Portuguese for snakeroot), is widely used to treat snakebites in Brazilian folk medicine.
Through serendipity (by chewing, brewing, and snorting) Neolithic people discovered opium, alcohol, snakeroot, juniper, frankincense, and other helpful substances.
Flora ADAM'S APPLE/CAP/FLANNEL/NEEDLE-AND-THREAD/PITCHER, DARWIN'S TULIP, DAVID'S-HARP, EVE'S-DARNING-NEEDLE, GOLDIE'S FERN, GRANDFATHER'S BEARD, HERCULES' CLUB (pepperwood tree), JACOB'S-STAFF, JOHN'S-WORT, JUPITER'S-BEARD, KING'S-FERN/-FRUIT/SPEAR, MERLIN'S-GRASS, PATTON'S HEMLOCK, QUEEN ANNE'S LACE, QUEEN'S CRAPE MYRTLE/-DELIGHT/-FLOWER/-ROOT/FETTLE/WREATH, SAMPSON'S SNAKEROOT, SOLOMON'S LILY/PLUME, VENUS' HAIR/LOOKING-GLASS
saccharum Sugar maple Actaea pachypoda Doll's-eyes Aesculus glabra Ohio buckeye Ageratina altissima White snakeroot AILANTHUS ALTISSIMA * Tree-of-heaven ALLIARIA PETIOLATA * Garlic mustard Allium tricoccum v.
Absent any grand plan, other than the floral expression of my rage, I was torn between the reptilian creepiness of Brunette Snakeroot and the terribly unremarkable purple of the castor bean plant.
The root of Rauwolfia serpentina (snakeroot), the natural source of the alkaloid reserpine, has been a Hindu Ayurvedic remedy since ancient times.
Check for white flowers in the woods at this time of year; they could be white snakeroot, poisonous to livestock.
It was discovered later that what may have prevented the said reptile from entering the caravan itself were two potted plants - the rauvolfia serpentina, or, to give it its more common name, the Indian snakeroot, or sarpagandha , parts of which have been known to deter snakes and parts of which have, historically, as far back as the days of B.C., been used in the treatment of people: Alexander the Great is claimed to have used it to treat a soldier struck by a poisoned arrow; and Mahatma Gandhi it is said turned to it for cures from migraines.
vomitoria has common names such as African serpent wood, and African snakeroot or swizzle stick.
Species Common Name Agastache hybrid Blue fortune anise hyssop Ageratina aromatica (L.) Spach Lesser snakeroot Aloysia virgata (H.R.
Sticky snakeroot, Mexican devil or Crofton weed call it what you want - since the early 1900s this weed has been causing grief in Australia.