snow crab

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snow crab

n.
Any of several edible spider crabs of the genus Chionoecetes of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, especially C. opilio.

[Probably from the fact that they live in northern seas and are typically fished in winter .]

snow crab

n
(Animals) Canadian an edible crab with long thin legs found off the coasts of Eastern Canada

snow′ crab`


n.
an edible spider crab of the N Pacific, Chionoecetes opilio, commercially important as a seafood product.
[1955–60]
References in periodicals archive ?
Seafood part sells oysters by the bushel - blue crabs - snow crabs - tilapia, sheephead, mullet, frog legs & more.
Migrations of snow crabs (Chionoecetes opilio) differ between sexes and among different size classes, resulting in distributions that are highly structured and complex (Ernst et al., 2005).
Snow crabs are caught in traps, from sandy bottoms in depths of one to 470 metres.
This time the fleet are chasing opilio, also known as snow crabs - an apt name considering they're caught in the middle of winter.
Our choice is justified by the fact that when males are present, female snow crabs usually are inseminated and extrude eggs within 6-24 h of molting (Watson, 1972; Sainte-Marie and Lovrich, 1994) but may continue to mate for about 2-3 d after oviposition.
2014) to more accurately infer the larval distribution and transport of snow crabs in their natural habitat.
Because of the tendency for autotomy of limbs in southern Tanner and snow crabs, all manipulations were carried out quickly with the greatest possible care.
In the East Sea, where Chionoecetes species occur, snow crabs are common at depths ranging from 200 500 m, whereas red snow crabs are found at depths from 400 2,000 m (Kort 1980, Yamasaki & Kuwahara 1991, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute 2008).
Molt started to occur around day 125 (early March) and was centered around day 152 (April 4, point of inflection of the curve) in snow crabs exposed to a higher temperature (FH and UH), compared with a start around day 160 (mid April) and a molt centered around day 182 (May 4) in snow crabs exposed to a lower temperature (FL and UL), with no effect of ration on the timing of molt (Table 2).
ABSTRACT To understand more fully the larval dispersal and settlement of the snow crab Chionoecetes opilio in natural habitats, we tested the effects of temperatures ranging from ~1-20[degrees]C and ~1-18[degrees]C on the survival and developmental period of snow crab larvae in the zoeal and megalopal stages, respectively, through laboratory experiments.