sob sister

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sob sister

n.
1. A journalist, especially a woman, employed as a writer or an editor of sob stories.
2. A sentimental, ineffective person who seeks to do good.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sob sister

n
(Journalism & Publishing) a journalist, esp a woman, on a newspaper or magazine who writes articles of sentimental appeal
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sob′ sis`ter


n.
1. a journalist who writes sentimental human-interest stories.
2. a persistently sentimental do-gooder.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sob sister - a journalist who specializes in sentimental stories
journalist - a writer for newspapers and magazines
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The sob sisters (male and female) of the day treated the departure of this 90-year-old as though they were describing the demise of a demigod.
Young, Gifted and Broke was commissioned along with two other new comedies - Sob Sisters (starring Derby-born Gwen Taylor) and The 19th Hole with Eric Sykes.
But the journalistic sob sisters have been out this week to scold.
In the third chapter, "The Original Sob Sisters: Writers on Trial, " Lutes uses the highly sensational 1907 murder trial of Harry Kendall Thaw to show the striking contrasts between the portrayal of the "sob sisters," as the handful of women journalists covering the trial came to be known, and the much larger contingent of male reporters.
In what is presented as the first study of actual and fictional newspaperwomen at the turn of the 20th century, one-time reporter Lutes (English, Villanova U.) examines their roles as stunt reporters (e.g., Nelly Bly), "sob sisters," and agents and objects of emergent mass culture.