sociableness


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so·cia·ble

 (sō′shə-bəl)
adj.
1. Fond of the company of others; gregarious: a sociable party guest.
2. Marked by or affording occasion for agreeable conversation and conviviality. See Synonyms at social.
n.
A social.

[French, from Latin sociābilis, from sociāre, to share, join, from socius, companion; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

so′cia·ble·ness n.
so′cia·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sociableness - the relative tendency or disposition to be sociable or associate with one's fellowssociableness - the relative tendency or disposition to be sociable or associate with one's fellows
personableness - the complex of attributes that make a person socially attractive
extraversion, extroversion - (psychology) an extroverted disposition; concern with what is outside the self
ambiversion - (psychology) a balanced disposition intermediate between extroversion and introversion
sociality - the tendency to associate with others and to form social groups; "mammals as a class are not strong on sociality"
conviviality, joviality - a jovial nature
companionability, companionableness - suitability to be a companion
camaraderie, chumminess, comradeliness, comradery, comradeship - the quality of affording easy familiarity and sociability
gregariousness - the quality of being gregarious--having a dislike of being alone
openness, nakedness - characterized by an attitude of ready accessibility (especially about one's actions or purposes); without concealment; not secretive

sociableness

noun
References in periodicals archive ?
329, donde sostiene: "el estandar del reasonable man implica la referencia a un comportamiento medio, ordinario, habitual, proporcionado: es decir, el comportamiento de una persona dotada de un buen sentido y equilibrio, que uniforme su accion a los dictamenes del raciocinio y a los parametros sobre los que se funda una determinada colectividad, como la fairness, la no-arbitrariness, la sociableness.
He had, indeed, the fine qualities of friendliness, of sociableness, of humanness, of simple hospitality, but we have no need to lower our vision from his unique qualities of greatness, or to seek to depreciate the unparalleled accomplishments of the man who dominated and gave birth to the being of a great nation.
The dimension E is understood first and foremost as sociableness (Costa & McCrae, 1992), and also associated with a feeling of happiness and satisfaction with life (Hayes & Joseph, 2003), and C as a factor associated with control of impulses and self-regulation, also defined as character (Costa & McCrae, 1992).