sociohistorical

sociohistorical

(ˌsəʊsɪəʊhɪˈstɒrɪkəl)
adj
involving social and historical elements
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper uses a sociohistorical lens to examine complex issues surrounding language-in-education policy in Micronesia.
In her role as "archivist" and family historian, Ernaux situates her narrative in a very specific geographical and sociohistorical context, and the theme of social class, which permeates all her work, lies at the heart of this text.
(Re)creating our world with words: a sociohistorical perspective of face-to-face interaction.
It makes a good case for studying nineteenth-century African American novels as literary forms rather than as sociohistorical treatises and for supplanting the slave narrative as the "foundational genre" of the African American literary tradition.
The first chapter emphasizes the sociohistorical background; Chapter 2 treats the immediate postwar period and its ideology.
Bernard Formoso's volume is arranged into three parts framed by an Introduction and Conclusion: the first part provides an overall picture of Thailand's sociohistorical development; the second part introduces the main social actors on the national stage; and the last analyses the social and economic dynamics that fuelled the ephemeral economic boom of the decade from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s.
This edition applies cross-cultural research findings to real-world social issues, introduces the sociohistorical and sociocultural perspectives to the study of cognition, expands upon discussion of social identity theory, and includes an exposition of recent biological and anthropological research on the concept of race.
Kraut knows his ancient politics and one of the joys of reading or consulting this commentary is the elegant way in which he is able to fill in blanks in the reader's knowledge of the sociohistorical context without getting sidetracked from the philosophical.
In his introductory essay Stevens makes important observations about the sociohistorical development of literary Spanish in Latin America; Stevens is particularly skillful in framing issues of Latin American culture for English-language audiences.
Each instrument entry offers a brief sociohistorical perspective, a materials/tools list, construction directions, playing suggestions, and ideas for construction variations.
THE SOCIAL RELATIONS OF JONSON'S THEATER is a useful addition to an increasing body of work that attempts to site Jonson's comedies in their sociohistorical context.
Comparing key films with American counterparts, she looks at both fatal females and males, asking to what extent these figures are distinctly French, and what specific sociohistorical and cultural context and crises of masculinity inform their construction.