sociolect


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sociolect

(ˈsəʊsɪəʊˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a language variety that is associated with a specific social group

so•ci•o•lect

(ˈsoʊ si əˌlɛkt, ˈsoʊ ʃi-)

n.
a variety of a language used by a social group; a social dialect.
[1970–75; socio- + (dia) lect]
Translations
sociolecte

sociolect

[ˈsəʊsɪəʊˌlekt] Nsociolecto m
References in periodicals archive ?
They creatively transform idiomatic speech, army slang and Mizrachi or East European migrant sociolect. It is partially for this reason that they themselves have become popular idioms and sayings often quoted by people who are unaware of their original context.
The unique position that RP holds as a non-regional sociolect, rather than an area-based dialect is accepted and taught but has not been considered in depth with much of the existing study accepting southern English standards as exemplary of RP.
Among the topics are the Aramaic of the Zohar: the status quaestionis, single-script mixed-code literary sources from the Cairo Genizah and their sociolinguistic context, Jewish Berber: a brief linguistic sketch, the schism between perceptions of the Yiddish language and Yiddish cultural realities, and Judeo-Arabic language or Jewish Arabic sociolect: linguistic terminology between linguistics and ideology.
In his key text the historian Munoz accomplishes the translation of post-structuralist thinking into the sociolect of peace studies.
Their Shylocks spoke Kanak Sprak, the originally Turkish-German sociolect which in the last two decades has been adopted, in a stylized version, by more heterogeneous urban youth subcultures.
Having two sharks speaking with the (stereotypical) sociolect of German-speaking Turks is a highly domesticating choice; a choice that builds upon and relies on the familiarity of the German-speaking audience with this particular comedy duo and its type of humour.
(18) Jarrell's essay is full of such absurd defenses of what he several times calls Whitman's "queer" style, but if despite Jarrell's riff Whitman's lines strike you as first Charlotte Smith then Wallace Stevens, that may be because their speech genre is not the pathetic plea of the foreign curiosity, but the patent sociolect of the Romantic ode, which as de Man and Culler have pointed out, came to be understood in the twentieth century as lyric addressivity.
SESEO, CECEO AND DISTINCTION IN THE HIGH SOCIOLECT OF SEVILLA CITY: NEW DATA FROM PRESEEA
Both participants in a given communicative situation share a mutual encoding and decoding process, which entails a relatively plausible means of spotting distinguishable lexical units of a specific sociolect in a synchronic manner.
(28) See Anne Scott, "Language as Sociolect: Havelok the Dane" Studies in Philology 89.2 (1992): 150.
In all of his plays, Tremblay explores what it means to speak in one's own tongue, whether in the broad sense of a language or in the more restricted sense of a sociolect.
For instance, it makes a difference whether 'right inuff' is translated from a Scottish or a class perspective: a translation into, say, Kanak Sprak (the German sociolect associated with Turkish immigrants) would probably be considered less appropriate to the former than to the latter.