sociology

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so·ci·ol·o·gy

 (sō′sē-ŏl′ə-jē, -shē-)
n.
1. The study of human social behavior, especially the study of the origins, organization, institutions, and development of human society.
2. Analysis of a social institution or societal segment as a self-contained entity or in relation to society as a whole.

[French sociologie : socio-, socio- + -logie, study (from Greek -logiā; see -logy).]

so′ci·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), so′ci·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
so′ci·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
so′ci·ol′o·gist n.

sociology

(ˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Sociology) the study of the development, organization, functioning, and classification of human societies
sociological adj
ˌsocioˈlogically adv
ˌsociˈologist n

so•ci•ol•o•gy

(ˌsoʊ siˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌsoʊ ʃi-)

n.
the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society; science of the fundamental laws of social relations, institutions, etc.
[1835–45; < French sociologie, coined by A. Comte in 1830; see socio-, -logy]
so`ci•ol′o•gist, n.

so·ci·ol·o·gy

(sō′sē-ŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of human social behavior and its origins, development, organizations, and institutions.

sociology

1. the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society.
2. the science of fundamental laws of social behavior, relations, institutions, etc. — sociologist, n. — sociological, adj.
See also: Mankind
1. the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society.
2. the science of the fundamental laws of social relations, institutions, etc. — sociologist, n. — sociologie, sociological, adj.
See also: Society

sociology

The scientific study of human societies, including their functioning, origins, and development.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sociology - the study and classification of human societiessociology - the study and classification of human societies
mores - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
social science - the branch of science that studies society and the relationships of individual within a society
criminology - the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior and law enforcement
demography, human ecology - the branch of sociology that studies the characteristics of human populations
psephology - the branch of sociology that studies election trends (as by opinion polls)
sociometry - the quantitative study of social relationships
structural sociology, structuralism - a sociological theory based on the premise that society comes before individuals
Translations
sociologie
sociologi
sosiologia
sociologija
社会学
사회학
sociologi
สังคมวิทยา
xã hội học

sociology

[ˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nsociología f

sociology

[ˌsəʊsiˈɒlədʒi] nsociologie f

sociology

nSoziologie f

sociology

[ˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nsociologia

sociology

عِلْمُ الْاجْتِمَاعِ sociologie sociologi Soziologie κοινωνιολογία sociología sosiologia sociologie sociologija sociologia 社会学 사회학 sociologie sosiologi socjologia sociologia социология sociologi สังคมวิทยา toplumbilim xã hội học 社会学

sociology

n. sociología, ciencia que trata de las relaciones sociales y de los fenómenos de tipo social.
References in periodicals archive ?
2013), the effects of policy initiatives on disciplinary reward structures (Siler and McLaughlin 2008), and the relationships between Canadian and other national sociologies (Fournier 2002; Gingras and Warren 2006; Warren 2014).
Sounding much like Emile Durkheim (1938:47-75), Burawoy argued that the "[e]mpirical examination of actual public sociologies would distinguish the normal from the pathological" (2005f:153), that is, differentiate legitimate from (presumably) illegitimate public sociology.
Internationally, few surveys exist of national sociologies and their origins, growth and characteristics, and--with the possible exception of India--even fewer of Asian sociologies.
In this work the authors draw our attention to a range of different sociologies and describe these in ways that might be unexpected.
Like most sociologies of knowledge, CS examines the construction of scientific fields or continued knowledge production within boundaries.
The introductory essay places these areas in the context both of more conventional sociologies of gender (highlighting both masculinities and femininities) and traditional scholarship on the prison, arguing for a return of this increasingly important social institution from the instrumentalist domains of criminal justice to the heart of sociological theorizing on topics of gender and social control.
We also noted how there is a strong history of feminist and critical approaches to critical sociologies of families, work, and care and how Canadian feminist sociologists have, for over three decades, reshaped the way we think, theorize, and intervene in policies and public debates about families, work, and care as well as gender, class, race, and sexualities.
Saint-Arnaud's main thesis is that "two sociologies of race"--a dominant Anglo-American and a peripheral Afro-American version--can be seen to emerge during this formative century, but that the two were mutually interdependent through asymmetrical academic exchanges, not all of which have ever been fully acknowledged.
She first describes the foundations of her "sociology for people" in the women's movement and differentiates from other sociologies with apparently similar political commitments.
The difficult task of forging links between these very different sociologies must be a priority for sociology, and especially for TASA, over the next few years.
Depending on how it is defined, there can be said to be between thirty-five and forty sectoral sociologies going in every direction.
Moreover, the disconnect makes sense in light of the fact that Berger and Luckmann's book was primarily about offering a micro alternative to the macro sociologies of functionalism and conflict theory, which were fighting it out in sociology at large at the time rather than emphasizing social construction in the subjectivist/relativist sense the term tended to take on, justified or not, in science studies.