sociologism


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sociologism

(ˌsəʊsɪˈɒləˌdʒɪzəm)
n
the attribution of a sociological basis to other disciplines

sociologism

a theory asserted sociologistically. — sociologistic, adj.
See also: Society
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Abstract: This article analyzes a recurrent epistemological confusion in some contemporary philosophical trends, namely, sociologism, which consists on the establishment of judgements on the justifi cation of science based on its historical origins.
This implies a radical critique of an economic history that highlights the inexorable succession of modes of production; of sociologism, which uses class struggle to explain everything, while failing to advance an understanding of class struggle itself; of the prevailing economic theory, which takes refuge in models derived from the courses and characteristics of the developed world; and of eclectic escapes and orthodoxy understood as repetition, trends, and tendencies that prevailed in diverse theoretical viewpoints in explanations of the character of Latin American capitalism.
Here Ioffe followed the same shift from psychologism to sociologism that was taking place among linguists at the institute at this time (see Brandist, 2006b).
Education is a central element within this Comtian sociologism as it is an intellectual and emotion-related practice.
Falasca-Zamponi is more admiring of Marcel Mauss, especially his concept of the "total social fact" which, she claims, broke with a narrow Durkheimian sociologism, and also his sensitivity to power in studying phenomena such as the potlatch.
The term, in its contemporary usage, was coined by Pierre Bourdieu to refer to a mediating position between subjectivity and objectivity: the habitus is "the principle of the transformations and regulated revolutions which neither the extrinsic and instantaneous determinisms of a mechanistic sociologism nor the purely internal but equally punctual determination of voluntarist or spontaneist subjectivism are capable of accounting for" (Bourdieu 82).
65) Ricoeur considers that the theory of reading and that of reception should avoid the dangers of psychologism and sociologism.
I am referring to sociologism as the research method proposed by Emile Durkheim.
This historicisation and embedding of the politics of rupture within the logic of its 'base', might appear to side with the sociologism condemned by Ross.
His magisterial The City of Man (1994,1998) combines an incisive critique of the historicism, economism, and sociologism characteristic of modern thought with a searching exploration of the tensions between nature and grace, reason and revelation, at the heart of modern life.
Woltermann's call for more "empirical" evidence will take us further in the direction of some kind of sociologism or other form of naturalism, he is proposing a general method that has been one of the origins and accompaniments of what Professor Gottfried calls the managerial state.