sodium thiopental


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sodium thiopental

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.sodium thiopental - a long-acting barbiturate used as a sedative
barbiturate - organic compound having powerful soporific effect; overdose can be fatal
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References in periodicals archive ?
The case had remained largely dormant since 2011 after the department abandoned its previous three-drug protocol because of a shortage of one of the drugs, an anesthetic called sodium thiopental.
The mare -- Rani -- collapsed in her sleep after being injected with sodium thiopental by the authorities.
Lethal vaccinations such as potassium chloride, sodium thiopental and pancuronium bromide are injected in the patients suffering from various terminal illness such as neurological conditions, last stage of Alzheimer's, chronic lung problem and heart failures.
Food and Drug Administration over its attempted import of another execution drug, sodium thiopental, from India.
Its next execution lasted 48 minutes--half an hour longer than officials expected--after the condemned inmate was first injected with Midazolam, a controversial sedative that many states turned to after the European Union banned exports of sodium thiopental in 2011.
The drugs used were sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide and potassium chloride - the method was developed in the 1970s in Oklahoma.
(16) In 2008, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the traditional three-drug protocol (sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride) used by many states for executions in Baze v.
According to Deborah Denno, a professor at Fordham University's law school who specializes in capital punishment issues, midazolam was originally Ohio's "plan B" to a protocol that began with sodium thiopental. After sodium thiopental was discontinued by the pharmaceutical manufacturer due to its usage in executions, midazolam became the state's go-to.
Since its introduction in 1986, propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol), a sedative-hypnotic agent chemically distinct from other intravenous induction agents, has been used for the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia and"conscious sedation" in greater than 80% of cases, virtually replacing sodium thiopental and all other short-ac ting barbiturates as induction agents.1 Chemically the drug is a substituted isopropylphenol.
These are sodium thiopental, which depresses the central nervous system in 30 seconds, inducing a degree of unconsciousness that makes pain undetectable; pancuronium bromide, a relaxant which takes 30-45 seconds to induce paralysis and respiratory arrest; and potassium chloride, which stops the heart in around 30 seconds.