soft coal


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soft coal

soft coal

n
(Geological Science) another name for bituminous coal

bitu′minous coal′


n.
a soft coal rich in volatile hydrocarbons and tarry matter and burning with a yellow, smoky flame.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soft coal - rich in tarry hydrocarbonssoft coal - rich in tarry hydrocarbons; burns readily with a smoky yellow flame
cannel coal - a bituminous coal that burns with a luminous flame
coal - fossil fuel consisting of carbonized vegetable matter deposited in the Carboniferous period
sea coal - pulverized bituminous coal; used as a foundry facing
References in periodicals archive ?
There were areas where no soft coal was allowed to be burned in homes or in businesses.
The export volume is down from recent years due to soft coal markets in the Pacific Rim, but Usibelli did ship seven shiploads of coal in 2014 to several destinations in the Pacific.
He published Soft Coal, Hard Choices: The Economic Welfare of Bituminous Coal Miners, 1890-1930 with Oxford University Press in 1992.
Martin said that lignite, a material similar to soft coal, causes problems with concrete sand because it is lighter than the sand and essentially pops out as the concrete sets, causing voids in the finished concrete.
8% from a year ago because its average cost of sales fell 18% year-on-year on soft coal prices.
Farmers received 18 cents a bushel for corn and paid $10 per ton for soft coal.
It also uses large and increasing amounts of lignite, a particularly dirty soft coal, to generate power, despite climate emissions targets.
Among the contributing factors for the soft coal market, Dean says, are the comparatively low price of natural gas and the number of power plants being converted from coal to natural gas.
know about Orange bears with their coats all stunk up with soft coal And
Among specific topics are recovering valuable metals from copper slag by hydrometallurgy, fluid flow in a large round bloom continuous casting mold, the kinetics of pressure acid leaching of zinc from zinc silicate ore, cost optimization of pig iron, a large-scale rotary steam tube drying system and equipment for copper powder, permeability characteristics of soft coal under higher confining pressure, virtual simulation of the ground scene of the mining area, and a technique to measure a metal tank's oil temperature and level.
But I have this little niggling thought - could this major change in our weather patterns be linked in any way to our ceasing to burn soft coal in our houses and factories at about the same time?