calcification

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cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

 (kăl′sə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Impregnation with calcium or calcium salts, as with calcium carbonate.
b. Hardening, as of tissue, by such impregnation.
2. A calcified substance or part.
3. An inflexible, unchanging state: calcification of negotiations.

calcification

(ˌkælsɪfɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. (Biochemistry) the process of calcifying or becoming calcified
2. (Geological Science) the process of calcifying or becoming calcified
3. (Physiology) pathol a tissue hardened by deposition of lime salts
4. (Geological Science) any calcified object or formation

cal•ci•fi•ca•tion

(ˌkæl sə fɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a changing into lime.
2. the deposition of lime or insoluble salts of calcium and magnesium, as in a tissue.
3. Anat., Geol. a calcified formation.
4. a process in which surface soil is supplied with calcium in such a way that the soil colloids are always close to saturation.
5. a hardening or solidifying.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kăl′sə-fĭ-kā′shən)
1. Medicine The accumulation of calcium or calcium salts in a body tissue. Calcification normally occurs in the formation of bone.
2. Geology
a. The replacement of organic material, especially original hard material such as bone, with calcium carbonate during the process of fossilization.
b. The accumulation of calcium in certain soils, especially soils of cool temperate regions where leaching takes place very slowly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calcification - a process that impregnates something with calcium (or calcium salts)
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
ossification - the calcification of soft tissue into a bonelike material
2.calcification - tissue hardened by deposition of lime salts
hardening - abnormal hardening or thickening of tissue
3.calcification - an inflexible and unchanging state; "the calcification of negotiations"
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
Translations

calcification

[ˌkælsɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] Ncalcificación f

calcification

nKalkablagerung f; (Med) → Verkalkung f

calcification

[ˌkælsɪfɪˈkeɪʃn] ncalcificazione f

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

n. calcificación, endurecimiento de tejidos orgánicos por depósitos de sales de calcio.

calcification

n calcificación f
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitamin K2 protects against soft tissue calcification, which is a factor involved in tissue "stiffening" that occurs with normal aging.
This vitamin, composed of several compounds called menaquinones, is transported by low-density lipoproteins to vessel walls, where it activates matrix Gla-protein (MGP), "the strongest inhibitor of soft tissue calcification presently known," according to Dutch biochemist Cees Vermeer.
But vitamin K2, which protects against soft tissue calcification, was something Lalanne overlooked.
Bone disease and soft tissue calcification in chronic peritoneal dialysis.
2) Primary hyperphosphatemic Tumoral Calcinosis characterized by a defect in phosphate resorption and (3) Secondary Tumoral Calcinosis: these patients have a concurrent disease that causes soft tissue calcification such as chronic renal failure with a secondary hypervitaminosis D, hyperparathyroidism and bone destruction.
Therefore, the same mechanisms that govern skeletal calcification also cause vascular calcification, in the absence or inactivation of soft tissue calcification inhibitors such as MGP.
Unusual metastatic soft tissue calcification in a hemodialysis patient.
Calcific myonecrosis is a benign condition and recognition of this entity is important in order to exclude other diseases that can lead to soft tissue calcification such as neoplasms, myositis ossificans, polymyositis and dermatomyositis.
Since vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase in parathyroid hormone and an increase in osteoclast activity, it seems that supplementation of calcium alone (without adequate vitamin D) is more likely to cause the problem of soft tissue calcification.
Since vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase in PTH and an increase in osteoclast activity, it seems that supplementation of calcium alone (without adequate vitamin D) is more likely to cause the problem of soft tissue calcification.
These include refined definitions of the characteristic bone abnormalities (changes in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth, or strength), as well as changes in mineral balance (calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone [PTH], and vitamin D metabolism) and vascular or other soft tissue calcification (Moe et al.
Founded in 2006, Calgenex Corporation manufactures and markets dietary supplement, topical OTC drugs and personal care products specially formulated to combat the effects of soft tissue calcification and inflammation.