ground cover

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ground cover

also ground·cov·er (ground′kŭv′ər)
n.
1. Small plants other than saplings, such as mosses, ferns, grasses, and low shrubs, growing on a forest floor.
2.
a. A low-growing dense growth of plants, such as pachysandra or crown vetch, planted for ornamental purposes or to prevent soil erosion in areas where turf is difficult to grow, as in deep shade or on a steep slope.
b. A plant used for such a growth.

ground cover

n
(Botany)
a. dense low herbaceous plants and shrubs that grow over the surface of the ground, esp, in a forest, preventing soil erosion or, in a garden, stifling weeds
b. (as modifier): ground-cover plants.

ground′ cov`er


n.
1. the herbaceous plants and low shrubs in a forest, considered as a whole.
2. any of various low-growing plants and trailing vines used for covering the ground, esp. where grass is difficult to grow.
[1895–1900]

ground cover

Low-growing plants that are grown to smother the ground and suppress weeds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ground cover - low-growing plants planted in deep shade or on a steep slope where turf is difficult to growground cover - low-growing plants planted in deep shade or on a steep slope where turf is difficult to grow
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
Hernaria glabra, rupturewort - common prostrate Old World herb often used as a ground cover; formerly reputed to cure ruptures
whitlowwort - any of various low-growing tufted plants of the genus Paronychia having tiny greenish flowers and usually whorled leaves; widespread throughout warm regions of both Old and New Worlds; formerly thought to cure whitlows (suppurative infections around a fingernail)
pearlweed, pearl-weed, pearlwort - any of various low-growing plants of the genus Sagina having small spherical flowers resembling pearls
baby tears, baby's tears, Helxine soleirolia, Soleirolia soleirolii - prostrate or creeping Corsican herb with moss-like small round short-stemmed leaves
2.ground cover - small plants other than saplings growing on a forest floor
underbrush, undergrowth, underwood - the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest
References in classic literature ?
Inaccessible and wonderfully extended over this soil covered with picturesque projections!
For conservation of such unique associations, the soil cover should be maintained in its natural status or under extensive but low-productivity management conditions, such as mowing or pasture.
Observed slope % and rainfall intensity (mm [min.sup.-1]) for each treatment combination of soil cover and target simulated rainfall intensity.
* Placement of soil cover over the remaining contamination in the Oxbow to facilitate enhanced natural recovery and preserve valuable habitat;
Systematized parameters of mean annual turnover of SOC according to soils and land use are needed for the introduction of sustainable management and ecologically sound protection of soil cover (Korchens et al., 1998; Lal et al., 1998; Halvorson et al., 2002).
From the agronomic point of view, one of the factors taken into account by producers, before planting, is the soil cover. In general, the soil cover is used to minimize the effects of erosion, conserve soil moisture by reducing evapotranspiration, control the use of irrigation water in the range of the crop plants and reduce the growth of weeds.
Various factors, like vegetation cover, soil cover, precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, soil texture, desertification potential, land forms and land use attributes were used to identify the land degradation problems in each soil geomorphologic unit.
It is assumed that soil cover shielding remains constant for the time period that the TCN are produced in the sampled surface, which is the time required to convert [LAMBDA]/E to soil (where the cosmic ray attenuation length, [LAMBDA], is ~60 cm in rock, and E = the local soil production rate) and is typically ~[10.sup.4] to [10.sup.5] years.
early boll set), and color of soil cover. Table 3 presents analysis of variance of the effects of these factors, and their interactions, on the amounts of volatile terpenes per weight of leaf.
Taken out of grain production, hillsides can be planted in orchards or with grass, which provides a far better soil cover than grain crops.
soil cover is required to prevent odors, blowing litter, vectors, and minimize the risk of fires, as well as improve the general housekeeping and appearance of the facility.