soldiering


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sol·dier

 (sōl′jər)
n.
1. One who serves in an army.
2. An enlisted person or a noncommissioned officer.
3. An active, loyal, or militant follower of an organization.
4.
a. A nonreproductive ant or termite that has a large head and powerful jaws.
b. One of a group of honeybees that swarm in defense of a hive.
intr.v. sol·diered, sol·dier·ing, sol·diers
1. To be or serve as a soldier.
2. To make a show of working in order to escape punishment.
Phrasal Verb:
soldier on
To continue to do something, especially when it is difficult or tedious; persevere: "As Russia decayed, these Siberians soldiered on, finding ways to live and enjoy life" (Jeffrey Tayler).

[Middle English soudier, mercenary, from Anglo-Norman soudeour, soldeier and Old French soudoior, soudier, both from Old French sol, soud, sou, from Late Latin solidum, soldum, pay, from solidus, solidus; see solidus.]

sol′dier·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soldiering - skills that are required for the life of soldier
acquirement, skill, accomplishment, attainment, acquisition - an ability that has been acquired by training
2.soldiering - the evasion of work or dutysoldiering - the evasion of work or duty    
dodging, escape, evasion - nonperformance of something distasteful (as by deceit or trickery) that you are supposed to do; "his evasion of his clear duty was reprehensible"; "that escape from the consequences is possible but unattractive"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that a basic knowledge of the military police core competencies of policing, investigations, corrections, and Soldiering constitutes broadening.
Jones, up for still another challenge, has applied to the Maryland Institute College of Art for next year's enrollment, and he will continue Soldiering in the 1192nd.
To give one example, Beattie traces the change in the gender of the Portuguese word for soldier, praca, which accompanied the transformation of soldiering from slavish to honorable endeavor.