soldiership


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sol·dier

 (sōl′jər)
n.
1. One who serves in an army.
2. An enlisted person or a noncommissioned officer.
3. An active, loyal, or militant follower of an organization.
4.
a. A nonreproductive ant or termite that has a large head and powerful jaws.
b. One of a group of honeybees that swarm in defense of a hive.
intr.v. sol·diered, sol·dier·ing, sol·diers
1. To be or serve as a soldier.
2. To make a show of working in order to escape punishment.
Phrasal Verb:
soldier on
To continue to do something, especially when it is difficult or tedious; persevere: "As Russia decayed, these Siberians soldiered on, finding ways to live and enjoy life" (Jeffrey Tayler).

[Middle English soudier, mercenary, from Anglo-Norman soudeour, soldeier and Old French soudoior, soudier, both from Old French sol, soud, sou, from Late Latin solidum, soldum, pay, from solidus, solidus; see solidus.]

sol′dier·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

soldiership

(ˈsəʊldʒəʃɪp)
n
(Military) the state of being a soldier
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soldiership - skills that are required for the life of soldier
acquirement, skill, accomplishment, attainment, acquisition - an ability that has been acquired by training
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
But there was a spirit in their bosoms which is more essential to soldiership than to wear red coats and march in stately ranks to the sound of regular music.
Some of them, indeed, by their services in the Low Countries and on other fields of European warfare, had fairly won their title to assume the name and pomp of soldiership. The entire array, moreover, clad in burnished steel, and with plumage nodding over their bright morions, had a brilliancy of effect which no modern display can aspire to equal.
"Oh, a LOT of people WE never heard of before - the shoemaker and horse-doctor and knife-grinder kind, you know - clodhoppers from goodness knows where that never handled a sword or fired a shot in their lives - but the soldiership was in them, though they never had a chance to show it.
Mere prattle without practice Is all his soldiership. (29) Othello has "seen the proof" of Iago's abilities "At Rhodes, at Cyprus and on others' grounds." Yet, he has promoted a "tongued consul"--a mere "counter-caster" (29)--whose knowledge derives from "bookish theoric" and is therefore useless.
The soldiership of the Baron of Bradwardine was marked by pedantry; that of Major Melville by a sort of martinet attention to the minutiae and technicalities of discipline, rather suitable to one who was to manoeuvre a battalion, than to him who was to command an army; the military spirit of Fergus was so much warped and blended with his plans and political views, that it was that of a petty sovereign, rather than of a soldier.
Drawing inspiration from Sahlins' discussions of Hawaiian and Fijian elites as active social agents in their encounters with foreigners, I am now able to formulate the main argument underlying this essay: I reason that during the 1961 British military recruitment campaign, my Fiji Islander interlocutors have shaped the 'structure of the conjuncture' particular to this critical juncture by appropriating cultural categories and discourses of Fijian soldiership and militarism in their encounters with the British recruiters (and colonialism more generally) to pursue their individual ambitions.
Pakistan is lucky in this regard; Armed Forces of Pakistan comprise the best of soldiership, and a growing defence industry which is booming with each passing year.