solecism

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sol·e·cism

 (sŏl′ĭ-sĭz′əm, sō′lĭ-)
n.
1. A nonstandard usage or grammatical construction.
2. A violation of etiquette.
3. An impropriety, mistake, or incongruity.

[Latin soloecismus, from Greek soloikismos, from soloikizein, to speak incorrectly, from soloikos, speaking incorrectly, after Soloi (Soli), an Athenian colony in Cilicia where a dialect regarded as substandard was spoken.]

sol′e·cist n.
sol′e·cis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

solecism

(ˈsɒlɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Grammar) the nonstandard use of a grammatical construction
2. any mistake, incongruity, or absurdity
3. a violation of good manners
[C16: from Latin soloecismus, from Greek soloikismos, from soloikos speaking incorrectly, from Soloi an Athenian colony of Cilicia where the inhabitants spoke a corrupt form of Greek]
ˈsolecist n
ˌsoleˈcistic, ˌsoleˈcistical adj
ˌsoleˈcistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sol•e•cism

(ˈsɒl əˌsɪz əm, ˈsoʊ lə-)

n.
1. a nonstandard or ungrammatical usage, as unflammable or they was.
2. a breach of good manners or etiquette.
3. any error, impropriety, or inconsistency.
[1570–80; < Latin soloecismus < Greek soloikismós=sóloik(os) (Sólo(i) a city in Cilicia where a corrupt form of Attic Greek was spoken + -ikos -ic) + -ismos -ism]
sol′e•cist, n.
sol`e•cis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

solecism

a violation of conventional usage and grammar, as “I are sixty year old.” — solecist, n.solecistic, solecistical, adj.
See also: Grammar
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

solecism

A usage that constitutes a breach of the standard rules of grammar or syntax.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solecism - a socially awkward or tactless actsolecism - a socially awkward or tactless act  
blooper, blunder, boo-boo, botch, bungle, flub, foul-up, pratfall, bloomer - an embarrassing mistake
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

solecism

noun
A term that offends against established usage standards:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

solecism

[ˈsɒləsɪzəm] Nsolecismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

solecism

n (linguistic) → Solözismus m (geh), → Fehler m; (in behaviour etc) → Fauxpas m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

solecism

[ˈsɒləˌsɪzm] n (frm) (in grammar) → solecismo; (in behaviour) → scorrettezza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He even took private instruction in English, and succeeded in eliminating his worst faults, though in moments of excitement he was prone to lapse into "you-all," "knowed," "sure," and similar solecisms. He learned to eat and dress and generally comport himself after the manner of civilized man; but through it all he remained himself, not unduly reverential nor considerative, and never hesitating to stride rough-shod over any soft-faced convention if it got in his way and the provocation were great enough.
She smiled again, turned, and walked away, leaving George to reckon up all the social solecisms he had contrived to commit in the space of a single moment.
But before his treason he imposed upon California a constitution that was a confection of sin in a diction of solecisms. The similarity between the words "sandlotter" and "sansculotte" is problematically significant, but indubitably suggestive.
The important truth, which it unequivocally pronounces in the present case, is that a sovereignty over sovereigns, a government over governments, a legislation for communities, as contradistinguished from individuals, as it is a solecism in theory, so in practice it is subversive of the order and ends of civil polity, by substituting VIOLENCE in place of LAW, or the destructive COERCION of the SWORD in place of the mild and salutary COERCION of the MAGISTRACY.
For it is the solecism of power, to think to command the end, and yet not to endure the mean.
I assert, then, that in the wondrous bodily whiteness of the bird chiefly lurks the secret of the spell; a truth the more evinced in this, that by a solecism of terms there are birds called grey albatrosses; and these I have frequently seen, but never with such emotions as when I beheld the Antarctic fowl.
But with reverence to these grave authorities, it seems unlikely that the assembled princes of Europe should have adjudged to Godfrey a coat armorial so much contrary to the general rule, if such rule had then existed; at any rate, it proves that metal upon metal, now accounted a solecism in heraldry, was admitted in other cases similar to that in the text.
Your garb and manner were restricted by rule; your air was often diffident, and altogether that of one refined by nature, but absolutely unused to society, and a good deal afraid of making herself disadvantageously conspicuous by some solecism or blunder; yet when addressed, you lifted a keen, a daring, and a glowing eye to your interlocutor's face: there was penetration and power in each glance you gave; when plied by close questions, you found ready and round answers.
Solecisms abound on these pages: the authors misuse the words "enervated," "disinterest" and "reticent."
Vaughan's preface gives fulsome acknowledgements to his editors and proof-readers at Yale, but it is the more disappointing to find some surprising mistakes, solecisms, and even misprints.
He raged against solecisms such as "pound's of apple's and orange's" in greengrocers' shops.
For most of the 20th century, however, all sorts of solecisms reigned, from using French 18th-century portrait frames turned sideways to house Impressionist landscapes, to doing without frames altogether.