soliloquy

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Related to soliloquist: soliloquise, soliloquized

so·lil·o·quy

 (sə-lĭl′ə-kwē)
n. pl. so·lil·o·quies
1.
a. A monologue in which a character talks to himself or herself or reveals his or her thoughts when alone or unaware of the presence of other characters.
b. A specific speech or piece of writing in this form.
2. The act of speaking to oneself.

[Late Latin sōliloquium : Latin sōlus, alone; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + Latin loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

soliloquy

(səˈlɪləkwɪ)
n, pl -quies
1. (Theatre) the act of speaking alone or to oneself, esp as a theatrical device
2. (Theatre) a speech in a play that is spoken in soliloquy: Hamlet's first soliloquy.
[C17: via Late Latin sōliloquium, from Latin sōlus sole + loquī to speak]
Usage: Soliloquy is sometimes wrongly used where monologue is meant. Both words refer to a long speech by one person, but a monologue can be addressed to other people, whereas in a soliloquy the speaker is always talking to himself or herself
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

so•lil•o•quy

(səˈlɪl ə kwi)

n., pl. -quies.
1. a speech in a drama in which a character, alone or as if alone, discloses innermost thoughts.
2. the act of talking while or as if alone.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin sōliloquium= Latin sōl(us) only, sole1 + loqu(ī) to speak]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

soliloquy

1. the act or custom of talking to oneself or talking when alone.
2. Drama, a speech in which a character reveals his thoughts to the audience but not to other characters in the play. — soliloquist, n.
1. the killing of oneself.
2. a person who has killed himself. — suicidal, adj.
See also: Self
a speech in which a character reveals his thoughts to the audience but not to other characters in the play. — soliloquist, n.
See also: Drama
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

soliloquy

A speech supposedly unheard by the other actors in which the character confides their innermost thoughts to the audience.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soliloquy - speech you make to yourselfsoliloquy - speech you make to yourself    
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
2.soliloquy - a (usually long) dramatic speech intended to give the illusion of unspoken reflections
actor's line, words, speech - words making up the dialogue of a play; "the actor forgot his speech"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

soliloquy

noun monologue, address, speech, aside, oration, dramatic monologue On stage Hamlet is delivering his soliloquy.
Usage: Although soliloquy and monologue are close in meaning, you should take care when using one as a synonym of the other. Both words refer to a long speech by one person, but a monologue can be addressed to other people, whereas in a soliloquy the speaker is always talking to himself or herself.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
einræðaeinræða persónueintal
独り言独白

soliloquy

[səˈlɪləkwɪ] Nsoliloquio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

soliloquy

[səˈlɪləkwi] nsoliloque m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

soliloquy

nMonolog m (also Theat), → Zwiegespräch ntmit sich selbst
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

soliloquy

[səˈlɪləkwɪ] nsoliloquio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
I explore its role here in "Interrogating the Soliloquist: Does It Really Go Without Saying?" Symploke 18 (2010): 131-54.
(48.) This shift is clearly signaled when Angelo exits and Isabella assumes the privileged subjective position of soliloquist, appealing implicitly to audience members as witnesses: "To whom should I complain?
The upper classes are no less "real" than members of the other orders of society, and Ibsen's protagonists are as apt to break into set-piece declamation as any Shakespearean soliloquist. In my book, the theatrical master at capturing reality--internal and external--has always been Chekhov.
Fortunately, Temple's portentous narration, which sounds like Patrick Stewart doing a parody of an over-serious soliloquist, intrudes infrequently, allowing proper space for expert voices such as wise activist Grace Lee Botts and Motown luminary Martha Reeves.
In the figure of the soliloquist, we encounter the perfect clinical subject for obtaining what Damasio describes as a "sense of a self in the act of knowing" (1999, 308).