solipsism


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sol·ip·sism

 (sŏl′ĭp-sĭz′əm, sō′lĭp-)
n.
1. Philosophy The theory that the self is the only thing that can be known and verified.
2. The view that the self is the only reality.
3. Absorption with oneself without consideration for the needs and desires of others: a self-indulgent memoir that revealed the author's solipsism.

[Latin sōlus, alone; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + Latin ipse, self + -ism.]

sol′ip·sist n.
sol′ip·sis′tic adj.

solipsism

(ˈsɒlɪpˌsɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy the extreme form of scepticism which denies the possibility of any knowledge other than of one's own existence
[C19: from Latin sōlus alone + ipse self]
ˈsolipsist n, adj
ˌsolipˈsistic adj

sol•ip•sism

(ˈsɒl ɪpˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the theory that only the self exists, or can be proved to exist.
2. self-absorption.
[1880–85; < Latin sōl(us) only, sole1 + ips(e) self + -ism]
sol′ip•sist, n.
sol`ip•sis′tic, adj.

solipsism

the theory that only the self exists or can be proved to exist. Also called panegoism. — solipsist, n.solipsistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solipsism - (philosophy) the philosophical theory that the self is all that you know to exist
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
solipsismus
solipsismi

solipsism

[ˈsəʊlɪpsɪzəm] Nsolipsismo m

solipsism

nSolipsismus m

solipsism

[ˈsɒlɪpˌsɪzm] nsolipsismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Call it lazy solipsism all you want, but it's a difficult argument to counter.
It took me nearly a month to recover: I can't recall ever reacting to a television show so viscerally, yelling at the screen in futile hope that my shrieks will pierce the characters' impenetrable solipsism.
SHAPE, FORM, FIGURE: THE IMPERFECTLY PERCEIVED INDIVIDUAL AND THE SOLIPSISM OF LOVE
Where skepticism denies the possibility of transcendence, solipsism refuses even to consider it, to pay it heed or give it a hearing.
IF YOU didn't think you could tackle solipsism in a book aimed at eight year olds, think again.
For if the figure of the Oriental despot repeats, at a seemingly safe cultural distance, the solipsism that the Romantic inferiority of being necessarily risks, despotism and a putatively "Oriental" fatalism together constitute the political predicament of liberal Romanticism, even as the threat of global likeness makes conservative Romantics edgy.
This reviewer suspects a mixture of the unfortunate influence of language theory, which challenges the possibility of communication, a degree of solipsism reinforced by certain realities of poetry's place in American culture, and an overemphasis on "self" The fact is that the long poem in this book, "The Charter of Effects," comprised of fifteen sections and supposedly the centerpiece of the collection, induces more headache than marvel.
Quoting widely from Fodor's work of over thirty years, Arnold discusses mainly two elements in Fodor's thought: the separation of a mental event's content and its causal characteristics (which belong to the mental event only insofar as it is a neurophysical event) on the one hand, and, on the other, a methodological solipsism that Fodor has to countenance if he admits, as he did especially in his later work, that content features among the causally relevant properties of a mental event.
Life eventually cured her solipsism, starting with her spontaneous empathy for a grad school co-worker heading off to Vietnam and by extension for all the soldiers on both sides of the conflict and all the people of Vietnam.
This methodological weakness is typical of a lot of post-modern "syllogism physics" (and ultimately the solipsism of such scientism in general).
It's uncanny how much Dolan's style and overall solipsism have evolved in five years' time, resulting in a funny, heartbreaking and, above all, original work--right down to its unusual 1:1 aspect ratio --that feels derivative of no one, not even himself.
Turning Duchamp on his head, El Roto ventures a possible, and defiant, response to the question of what art is: "Arte es lo que se expone donde se expone arte"--Art is what is exhibited where art is exhibited, he asserts, in a statement both accurate and critical insofar as it points out the solipsism of the art world.