solipsism

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sol·ip·sism

 (sŏl′ĭp-sĭz′əm, sō′lĭp-)
n.
1. Philosophy The theory that the self is the only thing that can be known and verified.
2. The view that the self is the only reality.
3. Absorption with oneself without consideration for the needs and desires of others: a self-indulgent memoir that revealed the author's solipsism.

[Latin sōlus, alone; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + Latin ipse, self + -ism.]

sol′ip·sist n.
sol′ip·sis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

solipsism

(ˈsɒlɪpˌsɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy the extreme form of scepticism which denies the possibility of any knowledge other than of one's own existence
[C19: from Latin sōlus alone + ipse self]
ˈsolipsist n, adj
ˌsolipˈsistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sol•ip•sism

(ˈsɒl ɪpˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the theory that only the self exists, or can be proved to exist.
2. self-absorption.
[1880–85; < Latin sōl(us) only, sole1 + ips(e) self + -ism]
sol′ip•sist, n.
sol`ip•sis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

solipsism

the theory that only the self exists or can be proved to exist. Also called panegoism. — solipsist, n.solipsistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solipsism - (philosophy) the philosophical theory that the self is all that you know to exist
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
solipsismus
solipsismi

solipsism

[ˈsəʊlɪpsɪzəm] Nsolipsismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

solipsism

nSolipsismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

solipsism

[ˈsɒlɪpˌsɪzm] nsolipsismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Hopefully this point is uncontroversial, for to most people genuine disbelief in the existence of other minds will be an impossibility, and certainly the history of philosophy contains no idealists who have been solipsists. Nonetheless, it is worth highlighting that for an idealist the sense in which such other minds are deemed real is fundamentally different from that in which perceived objects are said to exist; for the subjective consciousness of others can never be or become any sort of object of our experience.
By implication, the criticism that Hamlyn levied against his supposed solipsists could be correct that there could be a self-independent world.
As extreme as that sounds, Fodor is not exaggerating when he also says that Putnam is one among the few philosophers who can say important things about "the philosophical interpretation of quantum mechanics, the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, the philosophy of mathematics, philosophical ethics (analytic and otherwise), and the debate between solipsists, phenomenologists and realists about the epistemological and metaphysical status of 'external' objects" (Fodor 2013: 30).
In the sense of critical epistemicity, Einstein, for example, criticized both certain self-assured theists and atheists, among both vocal scientists and vocal lay people concerned about often blurry, oversimplified entities such as "god" and "nature", as "rogue solipsists".
The virtual class is part of the general intellect, but lacks any self-consciousness of this fact, and makes no strides towards forming an actual community (or at best constitutes an agglomeration of like-minded solipsists).
Reviewing Toward the End of Time, for instance, Wallace criticizes John Updike's male "emotional solipsists": "Though usually family men, they never really love anybody--and, though always heterosexual to the point of satyriasis, they especially don't love women" ("Certainly" 53).
In a democratic world of individual solipsists, government is the greatest solipsist of them all.
The last page is blank but for an immortal quotation from William Faulkner's Nobel Prize acceptance speech: "I decline to accept the end of man." This polite rebuke alone puts all the religious solipsists and con artists in their place.
"War is the great maker of solipsists: how are you going to save my life today?
It thus appears that only anarchists, nihilists, (9) and solipsists can be comfortable with the right to bear arms.