solitariness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sol·i·tar·y

 (sŏl′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Existing, living, or going without others; alone: a solitary traveler. See Synonyms at alone.
2. Happening, done, or made alone: a solitary evening; solitary pursuits such as reading and sewing.
3. Remote from civilization; secluded: a solitary retreat.
4. Zoology Living alone or in pairs only: solitary wasps; solitary sparrows.
5. Single and set apart from others: a solitary instance of cowardice.
n. pl. sol·i·tar·ies
1. A person who lives alone; a recluse.
2. Solitary confinement.

[Middle English, from Old French solitaire, from Latin sōlitārius, from sōlitās, solitude, from sōlus, alone; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

sol′i·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
sol′i·tar′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solitariness - the state of being alone in solitary isolationsolitariness - the state of being alone in solitary isolation
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
2.solitariness - a disposition toward being alone
friendlessness - being without friends
reclusiveness - a disposition to prefer seclusion or isolation
disposition, temperament - your usual mood; "he has a happy disposition"

solitariness

noun
The quality or state of being alone:
Translations

solitariness

n (of task) → Einsamkeit f; (of life) → Abgeschiedenheit f
References in classic literature ?
With Hayward, Philip had disdained humanity in the mass; he adopted the attitude of one who wraps himself in solitariness and watches with disgust the antics of the vulgar; but Clutton and Lawson talked of the multitude with enthusiasm.
Sir Thomas's sending away his son seemed to her so like a parent's care, under the influence of a foreboding of evil to himself, that she could not help feeling dreadful presentiments; and as the long evenings of autumn came on, was so terribly haunted by these ideas, in the sad solitariness of her cottage, as to be obliged to take daily refuge in the dining-room of the Park.
It was painful to look upon their deserted grounds, and still worse to anticipate the new hands they were to fall into; and to escape the solitariness and the melancholy of so altered a village, and be out of the way when Admiral and Mrs Croft first arrived, she had determined to make her own absence from home begin when she must give up Anne.
The journey in itself had no terrors for her; and she began it without either dreading its length or feeling its solitariness. Leaning back in one comer of the carriage, in a violent burst of tears, she was conveyed some miles beyond the walls of the abbey before she raised her head; and the highest point of ground within the park was almost closed from her view before she was capable of turning her eyes towards it.
It was, I confess, beyond my hope to meet with this rare combination of elements both solid and attractive, adapted to supply aid in graver labors and to cast a charm over vacant hours; and but for the event of my introduction to you (which, let me again say, I trust not to be superficially coincident with foreshadowing needs, but providentially related thereto as stages towards the completion of a life's plan), I should presumably have gone on to the last without any attempt to lighten my solitariness by a matrimonial union.
Solitude, but not solitariness; for he walked shoulder to shoulder with a shadowy companion--not little Hilda Burgoyne, by any means, but some one vastly dearer to him than she had ever been--his own young self, the youth who had waited for him upon the steps of the British Museum that night, and who, though he had tried to pass so quietly, had known him and come down and linked an arm in his.
We know that his younger brother Robert, who appeared as 'the forsaken Knight that had vowed solitariness', spent more than [pounds]400 on 'caparisons' and a gift for the queen.(17) Compared with this, Lady Carey's [pounds]5 reward to Nashe for Christs Teares seems quite modest, though we do not know how much it cost, in addition, to bail him out of prison.
Awakened to the solitariness that is a human life, blinking to get one's bearings in the darkness, relativizes time and history.
This path at the same time led them away from the loneliness of crowded cities to the solitariness of nature.
There is a poem by the great 17th-century Japanese, Basho, for example, whose literal English translation, according to Hass, runs: "I feel sorrow (uki) / make me feel loneliness (sabishi) or solitariness / cuckoo!" (260).
Moreover, families could consist of various types of extension, consanguinity or solitariness -- and indeed could evolve very rapidly through these types -- without fundamentally changing their social definition as families or their householders' status as heads of families.
There is a sense of solitariness in the stratagems Douglass employs while learning to read, but the real causes and lasting effects of his literacy are, as I shall continue to argue, social and contextualizing, not solitary and isolating.