solitude


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sol·i·tude

 (sŏl′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. The state or quality of being alone or remote from others: Composers need solitude to work.
2.
a. The state of being secluded or uninhabited: sought out the solitude of the forest.
b. A secluded or uninhabited place: "Beyond his bleak sky-line there stretched vast solitudes" (Jack London).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sōlitūdō, from sōlus, alone; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

solitude

(ˈsɒlɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. the state of being solitary or secluded
2. poetic a solitary place
[C14: from Latin sōlitūdō, from sōlus alone, sole1]
ˌsoliˈtudinous adj

sol•i•tude

(ˈsɒl ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. the state of being or living alone; seclusion.
2. remoteness from habitations: the solitude of the woods.
3. a lonely, unfrequented place.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French < Latin sōlitūdō, derivative of sōl(us) only, sole1]
sol`i•tu′di•nous (-n əs) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solitude - a state of social isolationsolitude - a state of social isolation    
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
2.solitude - the state or situation of being alone
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
3.solitude - a solitary placesolitude - a solitary place      
place, spot, topographic point - a point located with respect to surface features of some region; "this is a nice place for a picnic"; "a bright spot on a planet"

solitude

noun
1. isolation, privacy, seclusion, retirement, loneliness, ivory tower, reclusiveness Imagine long golden beaches where you can wander in solitude.
2. (Poetic) wilderness, waste, desert, emptiness, wasteland travelling by yourself in these vast solitudes
Related words
like automania
fear eremophobia
Quotations
"far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife" [Thomas Gray Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard]
"Solitude should teach us how to die" [Lord Byron Childe Harold]
"That inward eye"
"Which is the bliss of solitude" [William Wordsworth I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud]
"Two paradises 'twere in one"
"To live in paradise alone" [Andrew Marvell The Garden]

solitude

noun
The quality or state of being alone:
Translations
عُزْلَه
samota
ensomhed
yksinäisyys
egyedüllétmagány
kesepian
einsemdeinvera
singurătate
samota
samota
ensamhet

solitude

[ˈsɒlɪtjuːd] Nsoledad f

solitude

[ˈsɒlɪtjuːd] nsolitude f
to live in solitude → vivre dans la solitude

solitude

nEinsamkeit f; (of place also)Abgelegenheit f

solitude

[ˈsɒlɪtjuːd] nsolitudine f

solitary

(ˈsolitəri) adjective
1. alone; without companions. a solitary traveller.
2. living or being alone, by habit or preference. She was a solitary person.
3. single. not a solitary example.
ˈsolitude (-tjuːd) noun
the state of being alone. He likes solitude; He lives in solitude.
solitary confinement
imprisonment in a cell by oneself. He was sentenced to six months' solitary confinement.
References in classic literature ?
Where solitude endeth, there beginneth the market-place; and where the market-place beginneth, there beginneth also the noise of the great actors, and the buzzing of the poison-flies.
Now in your last one, on solitude, you haven't said anything very interesting, and you've made it too common and every-day to sound well.
In truth, the man who would behold aright the glory of God upon earth must in solitude behold that glory.
But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth.
Silence and solitude brood over Tahoe; and silence and solitude brood also over this lake of Genessaret.
Solitude in London was a privilege and a pleasure, viewed as the alternative to such companionship as this.
Dantes, cast from solitude into the world, frequently experienced an imperious desire for solitude; and what solitude is more complete, or more poetical, then that of a ship floating in isolation on the sea during the obscurity of the night, in the silence of immensity, and under the eye of heaven?
Hence it is that when she appears they look to her as knowing all things, while she no longer gives them advice, but in solitude laments their past folly.
Neither the captain nor the mate would believe my story, judging that solitude and danger had made me mad; and fearing their opinion might be that of others, I refrained from telling my adventure further, and professed to recall nothing that had happened to me between the loss of the "Lady Vain" and the time when I was picked up again,-- the space of a year.
Its solitude, in the depths of woods, was what, more than all, had pleased them.
Thus, in spite of his solitude, or in consequence of his solitude, his life was exceedingly full.
I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.